Spotlight on Special Interest Group 8, Audiology and Public Health

Looking for a group that explores the relationship between audiological services and public health issues? Let Amy Boudin-George explain why this SIG is for you. When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join? I joined after I began working in the Department of Defense (DoD), where hearing loss and prevention are seen as being in the public health domain, in addition to being a medical issue. SIG 8 hits that exact mark and goes beyond, showing how hearing loss and tinnitus are public health issues on a global scale. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career? I am much more acutely aware of my role as an audiologist in providing services beyond the diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss. We have to evolve as a profession to help the public see that we are more than “button-pushers,” and SIG 8 is helping to address this. We’ve had online discussions and conference sessions that provided insight into how to maximize your time using technology, and how to address hearing loss and tinnitus prevention and rehabilitation in meaningful ways to patients. How do you carve out time to volunteer with the SIG while working in your full-time job and balancing other commitments? What advice would you give to someone who’d like to get more involved in the SIG, including how you get support from your supervisor/institution? Being a part of SIG 8 goes beyond the volunteer activities: You...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care Private Practice Slider audiologist educational audiologist Hearing Aids Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss hearing protection public health Source Type: blogs

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Conditions:   Tinnitus;   Hearing Aids;   Normal Hearing Intervention:   Device: Receiver in the canal (RIC) hearing aids Sponsor:   VA Office of Research and Development Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
This study summarizes new tinnitus data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). DATA AND METHODS: Data were collected for individuals aged 19 to 79 years (n=6,571) from 2012 through 2015 as part of the CHMS. Tinnitus is described as "the presence of hissing, buzzing, ringing, rushing or roaring sounds in your ears when there is no other sound around you." Bothersome tinnitus refers to tinnitus affecting sleep, concentration or mood. Factors associated with tinnitus were examined using bivariate and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: An estimated 37% of adult Canadians (9.2 million) had experi...
Source: Health Reports - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Health Rep Source Type: research
Authors: Boecking B, Brueggemann P, Mazurek B Abstract Tinnitus is a common symptom of unclear origin that can be multifactorially caused and maintained. It is frequently, but not inevitably, associated with hearing loss. Emotional distress and maladaptive coping strategies - that are associated with or amplified by the tinnitus percept - pose key targets for psychological interventions. Once somatic contributors are identified and treated as applicable, psychological approaches comprise normalizing psychoeducational and psychotherapeutic interventions. Measures to improve hearing perception (e. g., hea...
Source: HNO - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: HNO Source Type: research
Conclusion: tDCS can be used as an adjunctive treatment in patients with severe tinnitus. Although tDCS did not decrease the loudness of tinnitus, it could alleviate the distress associated with the condition in some patients with a moderate or catastrophic handicap. PMID: 30662385 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence to support the superiority of sound therapy for tinnitus over waiting list control, placebo or education/information with no device. There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority or inferiority of any of the sound therapy options (hearing aid, sound generator or combination hearing aid) over each other. The quality of evidence for the reported outcomes, assessed using GRADE, was low. Using a combination device, hearing aid or sound generator might result in little or no difference in tinnitus symptom severity.Future research into the effectiveness of sound therapy in patients w...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
There have been many reports on the treatment effect of cochlear implantation and hearing aids in the treatment of tinnitus in patients with severe hearing loss. However, as far as we are aware, there are no r...
Source: BioPsychoSocial Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Case report Source Type: research
Conditions:   Tinnitus, Subjective;   Hearing Impairment Interventions:   Device: Amplification with hearing aid;   Device: Customized music Sponsors:   Education University of Hong Kong;   Chinese University of Hong Kong Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Here are the most popular audiology posts from the past year—we’ll bring you the top five speech-language pathology posts next week! Does Auditory Processing Disorder Meet the Criteria for a Legitimate Clinical Entity? You wanted to know more about both side of the auditory processing disorder controversy. We ran a series of articles, and this installment from audiologist Andrew Vermiglio, director of the Speech Perception Lab at East Carolina University, garnered the most views. In the post, he states that the “concept of the clinical entity is important when addressing controversial conditions such as a...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Advocacy Audiology Health Care Hearing Aids Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss Language Disorders Source Type: blogs
The just-released film Baby Driver, starring Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, Ansel Elgort and Jon Hamm, features a lead character (Elgort) with tinnitus. As Baby, Elgort plays a skilled getaway driver who constantly wears earbuds, using music to drown out the ringing in his ears. Although there is no cure for tinnitus, other options can help manage the symptoms more effectively than continually blaring a soundtrack into the ears. Some management strategies include counseling, white or pink noise, habituation therapy (a sound therapy that helps the brain reclassify tinnitus and ignore it), hearing aids and more (see tinnitus-man...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Audiology hearing loss tinnitus Source Type: blogs
Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate mental distress and health-related quality of life in patients with bilateral partial deafness (high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss) before cochlear implantation, with respect to their audiological performance and time of onset of the hearing impairment. Thirty-one patients and 31 normal-hearing individuals were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory (STAI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF). Patients also completed the Nijmegen-Cochlear-Implant-Questionnaire (NCIQ), a to...
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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