New York Judge Rules Unvaccinated Students Can ’t Go Back to Class

A federal judge in New York denied a request that would have allowed 44 unvaccinated children to return to school on Wednesday. Citing an “unprecedented measles outbreak,” District Court Judge Vincent Briccetti said the parents had failed to demonstrate “that public interest weighs in favor of granting an injunction,” according to the Rockland/Westchester Journal News. Last December, amid a measles outbreak, public health officials in Rockland County took the bold step of banning unvaccinated kids from the classroom at schools with less than 95% vaccination rates. The parents from the Green Meadow Waldorf School sued. “While no one enjoys the fact that these kids are out of school, these orders have worked; they have helped prevent the measles outbreak from spreading to this school population,” Rockland County Attorney Thomas Humbach said after the judge’s ruling at the Federal District Court in White Plains. Although measles was eliminated from the U.S. in 2000, outbreaks of the viral infection have sprung up across the country, especially in places with pockets of unvaccinated people like the Pacific Northwest. New York has experienced a particularly severe outbreak, mostly affecting an Orthodox Jewish community who may not seek vaccines for religious reasons. The number of unvaccinated children in the U.S. has skyrocketed since the early 2000s, in part due to growing anti-vaccination sentiment. The ‘anti-vaxxer’ moveme...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight public health Source Type: news

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We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Beloved Hollywood celebrities, famous politicians or members of the British royal family: no better advertisement for fitness tracker producers and health tech companies. As models, actors and actresses are highly influential people, their early adoption of digital solutions could also push the masses towards living more healthily with technologies. On the other hand, celebrities are inclined to follow questionable health trends, too, which go against decades of medical evidence. Those examples, everyone should rather reject. Wearables conquered Hollywood, the White House, and the British royal family Celebrities are all a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Social media in Healthcare celebrities digital health digital technologies digital technology famous fitness future health influencer health influencers Hollywood trackers trends wearables wellness Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The message is clear, as far as governments are concerned: the more often something is repeated, the more likely the public will believe it. Or, in the words of Joseph Goebbels, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” [8]   References https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com…history-and-biology-of-vaccines/ http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/magic-madness-governments-nlp-assault-our-minds https://thenib.com/vaccines-work-here-are-the-facts-5de3d0f9ffd0 https://www.popsci.com/16-african-countries-have-overtaken-us-measles-vaccinations https:...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Christina England Logical Top Stories Maki Naro NLP truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
Conclusions There are some limitations to this study worth noting. First, although the online panel used for our survey is constructed to be representative of the Canadian population in terms of age, region of residence, income and education, selection bias and non-response bias cannot be ruled out. However, the sociodemographic characteristics of our respondents are not significantly different from those of the Canadian population of parents with children aged 5 and younger. Second, the MMR vaccination decision for the child was self-reported by parents which could lead to recall bias, and there was no other measure withi...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
The co-author of this post is Will Schupmann President Trump's possible appointment of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to lead a commission on vaccine safety should frighten all American parents. Kennedy, a vocal believer in the thoroughly discredited notion that childhood vaccines lead to autism, could strengthen the anti-vaccination movement, which would undoubtedly result in the deaths of unvaccinated children. Today's anti-vaccination movement has already proved to be dangerous. The Disneyland-linked outbreak of measles in California two years ago brought attention to a significant decline in vaccination rates, which vaccine o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Donald Trump, meet science. Science, meet Donald Trump. I bet you two are going to get along fantastically. OK, maybe not. It was never likely that an Administration that coined a term like “alternative facts” after just three days was ever going to be comfortable with a world of study in which facts are the hard, un-devaluable currency. If I tell you that the speed of light is 186,282 miles per second, you don’t get to argue for 187,000—not if you want to be taken seriously. But while you can’t change established science, you can try to deny it or silence it. On that score, the Trump team has...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized alternative facts climate change EPA onetime politics trump vaccines Source Type: news
By COURTNEY GILDENGIL and LAURA FAHERTY On January 10th, then-President-elect Donald Trump met with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a vocal skeptic of vaccine safety. Although the details and implications of the session are still unclear, the meeting and several of Trump’s tweets have raised questions among public health experts who wonder what, if anything, Trump might do on the issue as president. A chorus of celebrities and politicians continue to question vaccine safety and propagate a myth linking vaccines and autism, fueled by a fraudulent 1998 article by Dr. Andrew Wakefield that was later retracted. In 2014, RAN...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
On Tuesday, Robert F Kennedy Jr. told major media outlets that he may head a new Commission on Vaccine Safety. The purpose of this commission, per Mr. Kennedy, is to debate the science. “[Mr. Trump] says that his opinion doesn’t matter, but the science does matter,” he reported.At first glance, the idea of an impartial commission to debate and resolve a controversy does not seem like a bad idea. Except for two big problems.The first: Mr. Kennedy is a vocal anti-vaxxer. He has openly and repeatedly supported the notion that vaccines cause autism. Thus, he is by no means impartial.The second: Vaccine safety...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
President-elect Donald Trump made his previously vague stance on vaccines much clearer on Tuesday, when he invited vaccine skeptic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to chair a panel on vaccine safety and scientific integrity.  Like many people who speak out against current vaccination practices, Kennedy says he’s fine with the concept of the shots but strongly opposes the use of thimerosal ― a preservative that hasn’t been used in childhood vaccines in the U.S. since 2001.  Kennedy’s position against a scary-sounding chemical compound may seem measured, considering he has acknowledged that vaccines h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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