Transitioning from Infertility-Based (ART 1.0) to Elective (ART 2.0) Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies and the DOHaD Hypothesis: Do We Need to Change Consenting?

Semin Reprod Med 2018; 36: 204-210 DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1677526The use of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has increased significantly in recent years. While this is partially due to improved access for infertile patients, another contribution to the growth of ART utilization is represented by individuals without infertility, who electively chose to freeze their gametes and embryos for future use, before ever attempting conception spontaneously. Overall, the safety of ART for parents and children is well described and the risks are modest. However, while long-term health consequences for offspring as postulated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis are unknown, numerous animal studies suggest a predisposition for chronic diseases like hypertension and glucose intolerance. In this article, we argue that a key difference exists between infertile patients, who need to use ART as the only means to achieve pregnancy, and (likely) fertile patients who elect to use ART techniques as a family planning option. We believe that these two sets of patients are different and their risks–benefit ratios are different. We propose that while all patients should be aware of the risks, patients planning to utilize ART techniques without a diagnosis of infertility should be encouraged to think critically about the additional risks, particularly the “potential” long-term risks that may be imposed from these elective procedures. [...] Thieme ...
Source: Seminars in Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

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Di Che1†, Yanfang Yang2†, Yufen Xu1†, Zhenzhen Fang3, Lei Pi1, LanYan Fu1, Huazhong Zhou1, Yaqian Tan1, Zhaoliang Lu1, Li Li4, Qihua Liang5, Qingshan Xuan4* and Xiaoqiong Gu1,5,6* 1Department of Clinical Biological Resource Bank, Guangzhou Institute of Pediatrics, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Prenatal Diagnosis, Maoming People’s Hospital, Maoming, China 3Program of Molecular Medicine, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Hospital, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China 4...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Advanced maternal age women are at a higher risk of adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcomes. In both comparisons, worse outcomes were more prevalent in the older group, suggesting that poorer outcomes are more prevalent with increasing age. PMID: 30946794 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
Infertility affects approximately 11% of couples in the United States (1). Infertility treatment has been linked to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy including pre-eclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity worldwide (2, 3). Infertility status and infertility treatment may function independently as risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (3). Most of this risk may be due to the higher frequency of multifetal gestation; however, risk remains increased even in singleton gestations for those undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI; 4,5).
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster Presentation Source Type: research
This study provides an update and comprehensive evidence to support the observation that despite the fact that PCOS patients achieve better clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate, physicians should continue to consider patients with PCOS to be high risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes.
Source: Reproductive BioMedicine Online - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
Authors: Palomba S, Falbo A, Daolio J, Battaglia FA, LA Sala GB Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female disorder with a pathogenesis still today not completely known. To the present, PCOS is considered more than just a reproductive disorder since several metabolic consequences that could affect women's health during different stages of reproductive and post-reproductive life were reported. The aim of the current review was to evaluate present evidence-based data regarding the pregnancy complications in infertile patients with PCOS. An extensive literature search until February 2018 was performe...
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
We examined relationships between maternal age (modeled flexibly to allow curvilinear shapes) and pregnancy outcomes using logistic regression. We plotted absolute predicted risks to display curves from age 20 to 50 estimated for two risk profiles: (1) population average values of all risk factors; (2) a low-risk profile without preexisting diabetes/hypertension, smoking, prior spontaneous/therapeutic abortion, diagnosed infertility, inadequate prenatal care, low income, rural residence, or obesity. Results: Risks of hypertensive disorders increased gradually until age 35, then accelerated. Risk of multiple gestations, ...
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Reproductive and Perinatal Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. This association only occurs among underweight and obese women and not among normal-weight and slightly overweight women.
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
BOSTON (CBS) – If you’re struggling to get pregnant, your sleep, or lack thereof, may be contributing. In a new study published in the journal Sleep, researchers looked at more than 50,000 women of reproductive age in Taiwan and found that those with sleep disorders other than sleep apnea had a more than three times greater likelihood of experiencing infertility compared to those who didn’t have trouble sleeping. The women with sleep problems were also more likely to have chronic health conditions like high blood pressure and thyroid issues, so it begs the question as to whether disordered sleep is just ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Pregnancy Sleeping Source Type: news
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