Global Influenza Strategy 2019 –2030

Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 3/2019. Cited as the most comprehensive and far-reaching plan that the World Health Organization has ever developed for influenza, this 31-page strategy is aimed at protecting people in all countries from the threat of influenza, preventing seasonal influenza, controlling the spread of influenza from animals to humans, and preparing for the next influenza pandemic. It details how to build stronger country capacities for disease surveillance and response, prevention and control, and preparedness. Its Strategic Objective 4 is to strengthen pandemic preparedness and response for influenza to make the world safer. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Since its emergence the impact of COVID-19 has been profound, and the public health challenge seem to be the most serious seen in a respiratory virus since the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic (Soper 1919). Following its emergence in Wuhan, cases of COVID-19 were exported outside of China, mainly by travelers using the global aviation networks (Wu et al., 2020). It should be noted that transboundary spread of viruses is quite common in veterinary medicine (Klausner et al., 2015, 2017, 2018).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
The COVID-19 pandemic exerts inflammation-related parasympathetic complications and post-infection manifestations with major inter-individual variability. To seek the corresponding transcriptomic origins for the impact of COVID-19 infection and its aftermath consequences, we sought the relevance of long and short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) for susceptibility to COVID-19 infection. We selected inflammation-prone men and women of diverse ages among the cohort of Genome Tissue expression (GTEx) by mining RNA-seq datasets from their lung, and blood tissues, followed by quantitative qRT-PCR, bioinformatics-based network analyses ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Campos L, Mansinho K, Telles de Freitas P, Ramos V, Sakellarides C Abstract The possibility of a second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic coexisting with a simultaneous epidemic of influenza and the co-circulation of other seasonal respiratory viruses sets the stage for a perfect storm. Preparing for the Autumn-Winter of 2020/2021 is complex, requiring centralized guidance but local and regional solutions, with strong leadership and a high level of coordination. It is essential to act upstream of hospitals in order to reduce demand on emergency departments, minimizing the risk of transmission that occurs there...
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
Kizzmekia Corbett joins TWiV to review her career and her work on respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and coronaviruses and coronavirus vaccines, including her role in development and testing of a spike-encoding mRNA vaccine, and then we review the Nobel Prize for discovery of hepatitis C virus. Click arrow to playDownload TWiV 670 (76 MB .mp3, […]
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: This Week in Virology coronavirus COVID-19 influenza virus mRNA-1273 pandemic prefusion conformation respiratory syncytial virus SARS-CoV-2 spike vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs
As America ’s biopharmaceutical companies work around the clock to combat COVID-19, another virus with deadly consequences is right around the corner. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to more than 7.5 million infections and tragically more than210,000 deaths. The influenza virus, more commonly known as the flu, is starting to circulate in the U.S. This year, already-strained health systems across the U.S. are preparing for a double whammy: flu season compounded by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
Source: The Catalyst - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: Research and Development Vaccines & D Focus Source Type: news
ana Baz Guy Boivin Two antiviral classes, the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) and polymerase inhibitors (baloxavir marboxil and favipiravir) can be used to prevent and treat influenza infections during seasonal epidemics and pandemics. However, prolonged treatment may lead to the emergence of drug resistance. Therapeutic combinations constitute an alternative to prevent resistance and reduce antiviral doses. Therefore, we evaluated in vitro combinations of baloxavir acid (BXA) and other approved drugs against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) subtypes. The determination of an effective concentration inhibiting virus...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
An enigmatic epidemiological feature of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the high rate of asymptomatic infection in pregnant women.1 This is puzzling because systemic immune changes predispose pregnant women to increased severity of respiratory viral infections, especially influenza A.2 A major roadblock in understanding this atypical clinical presentation is the poor characterization of cellular entry factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) — angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the androgen-sensitive transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) — in the respiratory tract during pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
While the world awaits a proven COVID-19 vaccine, medical experts are turning their attention to a shot that’s long been a key component in the public health toolbox: the flu vaccine. Experts hope this year’s flu shot can help prevent an influenza epidemic paired with another wave of coronavirus, which could overwhelm hospitals and lead to general confusion, given that it can be difficult to tell a COVID-19 infection from a case of the flu. This flu season is also something of a dress rehearsal for the eventual rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine amid the ongoing pandemic, allowing doctors, nurses and pharmacists a c...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
In January of this year, oblivious of the fact that we were about to engage in a twisted round of real-life Jumanji, we released our annual digital health trends e-book. Among one of our 12 forecasts for 2020 was that at-home blood tests would gain traction and become the new direct-to-consumer DNA testing in terms of adoption and availability. While the pandemic threw everyone off guard and messed up regular forecasts, we might have been onto something with our predicted trend. With the need to limit physical contact and trace COVID-positive individuals rapidly, public health authorities worldwide are finding rapid, po...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy fda testing outbreak covid19 at-home tests WHO point-of-care POC antibodies virus nasal swab test PCR Abbot Source Type: blogs
From the beginning of 2020, the governments and the health systems around the world are tackling infections and fatalities caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) resulting in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This virus pandemic has turned more complicated as individuals with co-morbidities like diabetes, cardiovascular conditions and obesity are at a high risk of acquiring infection and suffering from a more severe course of disease. Prolonged viral infection and obesity are independently known to lower the immune response and a combination can thus result in a “cytokin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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