Researchers decode how cancer drug works in brains of Parkinson's disease patients

(Georgetown University Medical Center) The first arm of a phase II clinical trial by a research team at Georgetown University Medical Center testing the use of nilotinib in patients with Parkinson's disease demonstrates precisely how the agent increases levels of dopamine in the brains of study participants.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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In this study, our aim was to examine the prevalence of SUMO gene variants and their clinical associations in PD. Fifty-four consecutively recruited PD patients (34 male, 20 female) and 74 age-gender matched healthy controls (37 male, 37 female) were included. SUMO1, 2, 3 and 4 genes were screened by a next generation sequencing method using blood samples of participants. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a significantly altered prevalence were determined by Bonferroni correction.Results: Two SNPs in the SUMO4 gene (rs237025 and rs237024) and two SNPs in the SUMO3 gene (rs180313 and rs235293) were found to have a...
Source: Neurological Research - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurol Res Source Type: research
  Cannabis, weed, marijuana, pot. It goes by several names, but we all know what it smells like. As weed becomes more mainstream, we on the Not Crazy podcast want to know: Is marijuana really an effective treatment for anxiety? Is it just a coping mechanism? Or a vice? In today’s podcast, Gabe and Jackie look at the research and weigh out the evidence. They also interview Eileen Davidson, a rheumatoid arthritis patient who regularly uses marijuana as a medicine to see what she has to say. What’s your take? Tune in for an open-minded discussion about weed. (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REV...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers here provide evidence for natural killer cells to act to reduce inflammation in the brain. This is of interest because chronic inflammation in brain tissue, neuroinflammation, is a prominent feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. If a natural mechanism that suppresses inflammation can be harnessed, it might be possible to slow or reverse neurodegenerative conditions, given that inflammation appears to play such a significant role in their progression. That said, recent work on cellular senescence in the supporting cells of brain suggests that selectively elimi...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Discussion Tachycardia is a rapid heart rate that is above normal for age and level of exertion. Tachycardia is common, particularly sinus tachycardia due to normally encountered circumstances such as pain, fever or exercise. It is usually a normal physiologic process but sustained tachycardia often indicates a potentially abnormal underlying cause. Sinus tachycardia has a rapid heart rate with normal P waves and P-R intervals and variations from moment to moment and respiration. Generally it is not over 200 beats/minute. Vagal stimulation can slow the heart rate; this is a gradual slowing, not an abrupt slowing seen in ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Abstract Human HSP27 is a small heat shock protein that modulates the ability of cells to respond to heat shock and oxidative stress, and also functions as a chaperone independent of ATP, participating in the proteasomal degradation of proteins. The expression of HSP27 is associated with survival in mammalian cells. In cancer cells, it confers resistance to chemotherapy; in neurons, HSP27 has a positive effect on neuronal viability in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. To better understand the mechanism by which HSP27 expression contributes to cell survival, we expressed human HSP27 in the budding yea...
Source: Biogerontology - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Biogerontology Source Type: research
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Ri-PNS is a multisystem neurologic syndrome with prominent cerebellum/brainstem involvement. Opsoclonus-myoclonus is less common than expected, and the disorder can mimic neurodegenerative diseases.
Source: Neurology Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Autoimmune diseases, All Movement Disorders, Gait disorders/ataxia, Parkinson's disease/Parkinsonism, Paraneoplastic syndrome Article Source Type: research
Reggie Dye went 15 years without seeing a physician, in part because he had always been incredibly healthy. He regularly does high-intensity worksouts, enjoys hiking, golf, and can't remember the last time he even had a cold. But a preventative health evaluation incentive program his company offered in 2016 taught him that even the healthiest individuals are not immune to prostate cancer. After two prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening tests, followed by additional testing, Dye was diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. At first, he was given the choice of active surveillance, als...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news
Authors: Mohd Sairazi NS, Sirajudeen KNS Abstract In recent years, natural products, which originate from plants, animals, and fungi, together with their bioactive compounds have been intensively explored and studied for their therapeutic potentials for various diseases such as cardiovascular, diabetes, hypertension, reproductive, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are characterized by the progressive dysfunction and loss of neuronal structure and function that resulted in the...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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