A Measles Diagnosis Is Confirmed in New Hampshire. Now, 12 States Have Cases of the Disease

A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No measles cases have been confirmed in Massachusetts this year, according to the CDC’s tally. Measles is a contagious but vaccine-preventable viral infection that is spread through coughing, sneezing and other close contact. It typically involves symptoms such as fever, runny nose, cough and a body rash, but severe complications can include pneumonia, brain swelling and death. However, no measles-related deaths have been reported in the U.S. since 2015, according to the CDC. Though measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000, officials have said clusters of vaccine skepticism have contributed to the outbreaks in the U.S. That resurgence has prompted some lawmakers and advocates to call for stricter vaccine policies nationwide, but lawmakers in at least 20 states have actually called for expanding non-medical exemptions or requiring doctors to provide pa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news

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A new measles diagnosis has been reported in New Hampshire, bringing the number of states with confirmed cases of the disease to at least a dozen. As of Mar. 7, 228 measles cases in 12 states have been confirmed so far this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s latest numbers. Outbreaks have been particularly severe in Washington and New York states. The sick person in New Hampshire reportedly contracted measles while traveling abroad, as the CDC says is often the case. The international traveler also took a bus from Boston to Manchester, N.H. in late February, WCAX reports. No mea...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news
A measles outbreak is spreading within New York City’s Orthodox Jewish community, with 21 cases coming from a single yeshiva in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, according to city health officials. The New York City Department of Health announced Thursday that 121 people have contracted measles since the outbreak began in October, and 31 cases have been newly identified. The vast majority of cases have affected children, particularly in the Borough Park and Williamsburg neighborhoods of Brooklyn. The outbreak’s initial case was acquired when a person visited Israel, where a measles outbreak is in progress, according to h...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The message is clear, as far as governments are concerned: the more often something is repeated, the more likely the public will believe it. Or, in the words of Joseph Goebbels, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” [8]   References https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com…history-and-biology-of-vaccines/ http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/magic-madness-governments-nlp-assault-our-minds https://thenib.com/vaccines-work-here-are-the-facts-5de3d0f9ffd0 https://www.popsci.com/16-african-countries-have-overtaken-us-measles-vaccinations https:...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Christina England Logical Top Stories Maki Naro NLP truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The outcome of measles outbreak in previously vaccinated oncology and post-HSCT pediatric patients during chemotherapy and immunosuppressant medication was severe. Complete loss of protective immunity induced by measles vaccine during chemotherapy was the potential reason. Improved infection control practice was critical for the prevention of measles in malignancy patients and transplant recipients. PMID: 28524832 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
The co-author of this post is Will Schupmann President Trump's possible appointment of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to lead a commission on vaccine safety should frighten all American parents. Kennedy, a vocal believer in the thoroughly discredited notion that childhood vaccines lead to autism, could strengthen the anti-vaccination movement, which would undoubtedly result in the deaths of unvaccinated children. Today's anti-vaccination movement has already proved to be dangerous. The Disneyland-linked outbreak of measles in California two years ago brought attention to a significant decline in vaccination rates, which vaccine o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Prevention is based on compulsory meningococcal vaccination, vaccination against seasonal influenza and pneumococcal infections for pilgrims at high risk of contracting the infection, and on vaccination against hepatitis A. Updating immunization for diphtheria/tetanus/poliomyelitis/pertussis and measles/mumps is also crucial and pilgrims must comply with hygiene precautions. PMID: 27230822 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medecine et Maladies Infectieuses - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Med Mal Infect Source Type: research
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