Behavioral and Integrative Treatment Development Program (R34 Clinical Trial Optional)

Funding Opportunity PAR-19-213 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to encourage behavioral intervention development research to test efficacy, conduct clinical trials, examine mechanisms of behavior change, determine dose-response, treatment optimization, and/or ascertain best sequencing of behavioral, combined, sequential, or integrated behavioral and pharmacological (1) drug abuse treatment interventions, including interventions for patients with comorbidities; (2) drug abuse treatment and adherence interventions; (3) drug abuse treatment and adherence interventions that utilize technologies to boost effects and increase implementability and sustainability; (4) interventions to prevent the acquisition or transmission of HIV infection among individuals in drug abuse treatment; (5) interventions to promote adherence to drug abuse treatment, HIV and addiction medications; and (6) interventions to treat substance misuse and chronic pain. Research of interest includes but is not limited to Stage I research.
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding

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This study is a meta-analysis — a study which includes many studies that are deemed similar enough to lump together, in order to increase the numerical power of the study and, ideally, the strength of the conclusions. The authors included studies that go all the way back to the mid-1990s — a time when cannabis was illegal in the US, different in potency, and when there was no choice or control over strains or cannabinoid compositions, as there is now. One of the studies in the meta-analysis included “cannabis dependent inpatients” in a German psychiatric hospital in which 118 patients were being det...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Marijuana Mental Health Source Type: blogs
We describe the historical use of opioids and the scope of the current opioid crisis, review the differences between dependence and addiction, and the private and public sectors response to pain management and highlight the issue of adolescent vulnerability. We conclude with a proposal for future directions that address both public and patient health needs.
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA: Edited by Jorge A. Gálvez Source Type: research
This study aimed to: (1) examine changes in pain, psychosocial functioning, and health care utilization among children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) over a 2-year period and (2) identify baseline biopsychosocial variables associated with the development and maintenance of chronic SCD pain at follow-up. Materials and Methods: Forty-two youth (8 to 18 y old) with SCD completed a battery of self-report measures at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translational Innovations Opportunities and Networks and American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT) diagn...
Source: The Clinical Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Purpose of review Opioids are potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain, but they are burdened by detrimental side-effects, such as respiratory depression, addiction, sedation and constipation. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g. perioperative) and cancer pain, but their use in chronic nonmalignant pain has met increasing scrutiny and has contributed to the opioid crisis. Thus, novel analgesics with reduced side-effects are badly needed. Recent findings Current research topics include enkephalinase inhibitors, allosteric and multivalent ligands, biased opioid receptor signaling and selective ac...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Tags: PAIN: NON-MALIGNANT DISEASES: Edited by Anthony H. Dickenson and Kirsty Bannister Source Type: research
Authors: Moryl N, Filkins A, Griffo Y, Malhotra V, Jain RH, Frierson E, Inturrisi C Abstract Cancer pain is often treated with opioids, a therapeutic regimen that can become a challenge in patients with an opioid use disorder (OUD). While use of the buprenorphine-naloxone combination is an effective medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for OUD, its use in pain patients with OUD has been controversial due to concerns that co-administration of buprenorphine can reduce or block analge-sia and precipitate opioid withdrawal in those patients requiring full opioid agonists. Data on its use in cancer pain patients are lack...
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
Considerable research has been conducted identifying risk factors associated with substance abuse disorders (SUD) in women. These factors include psychological and emotional distress, domestic violence, sexual abuse, weight control, fighting exhaustion, and chronic pain (NIDA: https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/substance-use-in-women). Another risk factor, and common experience among substance abusing women, is the death of a family member and unresolved grief (Furr, Johnson,&Goodall, 2015; Horton, Luna,&Malloy, 2018; McComish et al., 1999; Raskin, 1992).
Source: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
Background Opioids can induce significant respiratory depression when administered as analgesics for the treatment of acute, postoperative, and chronic pain. There are currently no pharmacologic means of reversing opioid-induced respiratory depression without interfering with analgesia. Further, there is a growing epidemic of opioid overdose that could benefit from therapeutic advancements. The aim of this study was to test the ability of two partial agonists of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, varenicline (used clinically for smoking cessation) and ABT 594 (tebanicline, developed as an analgesic), to red...
Source: Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Do you have difficult — or even toxic — family members? How does one go about setting boundaries with them? And is it OK to cut them off? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Jackie and Gabe tackle these tough questions with Sonya Mastick, a mental health advocate and fellow podcaster of a show called “What Won’t She Say?” Sonya shares her personal story of how she handled her toxic mom and demonstrates how it’s OK, and sometimes even necessary, to set strong boundaries with family members who hurt you. It’s also OK if those boundaries shift and evolve with time. Tune in for an hon...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Family General Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
If you have a big worry on your mind, you probably feel compelled to do something to try to resolve it as soon as possible. In my experience specializing in treating anxiety disorders, there are three main things people tend to gravitate towards when they are worried about something: analyzing it in their own head, talking to someone else to get their opinion/reassurance, and researching it online. All of these things can sometimes make us feel better in the short-term but really perpetuate the anxiety and cause more suffering in the long term. In this article, I’m going to focus on one of these behaviors: seeking op...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Communication Avoidance Catastrophizing Living With Uncertainty Reassurance Rumination worry Source Type: news
If you have chronic arthritis pain, you may be wondering about cannabidiol (CBD) as a treatment. CBD, along with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other chemicals, is found in marijuana. But unlike THC, CBD is not “psychoactive” — that is, it does not cause the intoxication or high associated with marijuana use. There’s a good chance you’ve tried it already: according to a Gallup poll in August of 2019, about 14% of Americans report using CBD products, and the number one reason is pain. The Arthritis Foundation conducted its own poll and found that 29% reported current use of CBD (mostly ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Marijuana Pain Management Source Type: blogs
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