ACC: Football players at risk for later life heart problems

Professional football players can develop heart abnormalities years after retiring...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI links gray-matter volume to blood pressure Studies question link between contact sports and CTE MRI ties high blood pressure to dementia risk CT scans of ex-NFL athletes reveal enlarged aortas Ultrasound finds high heart disease risk in some low-risk women
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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ConclusionThis study highlights the high prevalence of unidentified or poorly controlled VRF in people with mild cognitive symptoms attending a memory service. Given its importance to brain health and mitigation of future cognitive decline, a structured focus on identifying and managing these VRF in this setting is necessary. Exercise-based lifestyle programs should be embedded in post-diagnostic services for this population.
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Much has been made lately of millennials drinking less—and as America’s younger generations shift toward sobriety, recent research suggests the opposite is happening among its older ones. A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that, from 2015-2017, more than 10% of adults 65 and older said they had binge drank—defined as consuming five or more drinks in one sitting for men, or four or more for women— in the past month, up from about 7% in 2006. That’s in keeping with other studies that have charted increases in excessive drinking among elderly adults, inc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study public health Source Type: news
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
So much time and energy have been wasted these past 40 or so years in trying to reduce dietary fat, including saturated fat. All you need do is look around you to see the result: the most unhealthy, fattest, most diabetic population in history, prescribed more drugs, more reliant on this (corrupt and unhelpful) thing called modern healthcare, with people in healthcare such as your doctor blaming YOU, rather than themselves and their misguided message. After all, doctors and dietitians are following the dictates of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the USDA food plate that carries the blessings of Big Food and a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Low-fat diet grain-free low-carb undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
A day doesn’t pass that I don’t see some new “healthy” recipe for quinoa, or a dietitian or nutritionist gushing about the health benefits of this seed. Many make the claim that quinoa is high in protein and is gluten-free. Clearly, the gluten-free movement is fueling some of this excitement over  this seed. But how much truth are there in these claims? And just how healthy is quinoa as a replacement for grains? Let’s tackle these claims one by one: Quinoa is not a grain and is gluten-free This is absolutely true. While all grains, or seeds of grasses, are members of the family Poaceae, q...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle blood sugar carbohydrates carbs gluten-free quinoa Source Type: blogs
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