New research finds no link between measles vaccine and autism

A 10-year study of more than 650,000 children found no link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination series given to children and an increased risk of autism. The study of Danish children born to Danish mothers published in the medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine agrees with earlier studies in concluding that there was no overall increased risk of developing autism among children who received the vaccine compared to those who did not, even if th ey had a sibling with autism, U.S.…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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In a cohort of 657 461 children born in 1999 –2010, no association between the measles mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination and autism was observed. Despite this, it is unclear whether increasing medical evidence and facts about the lack of association between the MMR vaccination and autism will have beneficial impact in easing the minds of p arents and preventing unnecessary deaths. Prior to the availability of a measles vaccination in 1963, the majority of children contracted measles by the age of 15. Approximately 3–4 million US citizens were infected annually, with about 400–500 deaths, 48 000 hospital...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Physicians repeat it over and over: Vaccines like the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine do not cause autism; they are safe and effective. Yet the decades-old false claim that vaccines do cause autism has convinced millions of parents not to give their children potentially lifesaving shots and could lead more to opt out, according to Texas physicians.
Source: TMA News Room - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(This post has been updated with relevant recent information.) The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the UK Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outb...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
PMID: 31476225 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
Recently, one of the students whom I was precepting at my primary care site stated “we didn't learn much about the measles.” To which I replied, “no, we haven't talked much about the measles.” Certainly, the students had memorized the standard immunization schedule and were aware of the thoroughly debunked theory linking the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism, b ut they needed a refresher on the presenting signs and symptoms of the extremely contagious viral infection and how to educate their patients and families.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
(CNN) — There have been 971 cases of measles reported in the United States this year, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. This means 2019, which is not quite half over, now has the greatest number of cases in a single year in nearly three decades. The number of cases in 1994 was 963, which was lower than in 1992 when there were 2,237 cases. “Measles is preventable and the way to end this outbreak is to ensure that all children and adults who can get vaccinated, do get vaccinated. Again, I want to reassure parents that vaccines are safe, they do not cause autism. The greater danger i...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Measles Source Type: news
More people in the U.S. have been infected with measles during the first five months of 2019 than the total for any year since 1994, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Thursday. A total of 971 cases of measles have been reported in the U.S. since the beginning of 2019, compared to 963 cases during the entirety of 1994, according to the agency. The uptick threatens the nation’s measles elimination status, which was attained in 2000. Prior to that status, as many as 3 to 4 million people became infected with measles annually in the United States, the CDC said. About 400 to 500 people died fr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health measles onetime Source Type: news
(VANCOUVER, Wash.) — Parents in Washington state will no longer be able to claim a personal or philosophical exemption for their children from receiving the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine before attending a day care center or school under a measure signed Friday by Gov. Jay Inslee. The state saw more than 70 cases of measles this year, and Inslee signed the bill at Vancouver City Hall, in the county where most of those cases were centered. The new law takes effect at the end of July. Inslee said that while the bill was an important step in public health, he warned it doesn’t do “everything ne...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime washington Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs
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