Medical News Today: What causes urethra pain in men and women?

Urethra pain can occur as a symptom of many different conditions ranging from urinary tract infections to kidney stones. Learn about the potential causes of urethra pain and their treatments here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology / Nephrology Source Type: news

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We report on two cases treated with our standardized laparoscopic technique using only three 5-mm trocars. The proposed approach could be considered as the first-line treatment for RCU. [...] Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  open access Full text
Source: European Journal of Pediatric Surgery Reports - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundWe sought to determine the rate of emergency department (ED) attendance for complications after ureterorenoscopy (URS) for stone disease and to identify risk factors for ED attendance after URS.MethodsAn analysis of all patients undergoing URS over 12  months at a single institution was performed. Patient demographics, preoperative and intraoperative variables associated with postoperative complications and subsequent ED attendance were collected. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of URS complications presenting to ED.ResultsIn total, 202 ureteroscopies were performe...
Source: Irish Journal of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
When most people think about E coli, the first thing that comes to mind likely is eating tainted food or as a result of improper handwashing. What came as a surprise to me was that it can also show up as a UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) caused by kidney stones that back up in the urethra, which prohibits the flow of urine. It is more than an academic exercise that had me researching this all too common condition in men and women. As I am writing, I am less than 24 hours post-surgery to remove these pesky critters that have been backing up the works since 2014. It was my fourth go around that culminated in a cystoscopy,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health-related Personal caregiving Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThis study demonstrated that, compared to standard ECIRS, mini-ECIRS maintained SFR without increasing perioperative complications, tended to reduce postoperative pain and had a potential to reduce bleeding-related complications. This report suggests the advantages of ECIRS miniaturization for renal stones.
Source: International Urology and Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Lower back and testicle pain can indicate an underlying condition that requires medical attention. Possible causes include kidney stones, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and spinal problems. Learn more about the possible causes and when to see a doctor here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Back Pain Source Type: news
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD How long does it take to diagnose guttate psoriasis versus pityriasis rosea? Swimmers ear versus a ruptured eardrum? A kidney stone? A urinary tract infection? An ankle sprain? So why is the typical “cycle time”, the time it takes for a patient to get through a clinic such as mine for these kinds of problems, close to an hour? Answer: Mandated screening activities that could actually be done in different ways and not even necessarily in person or in real time! Guess how many emergency room or urgent care center visits could be avoided and handled in the primary care office i...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Hans Duvefelt primary care Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Non-string stents affected less the patients' QoL, in terms of general health and urinary symptoms, caused less stent related pain in cases of stent in situ and caused stent dislodgment in fewer patients. On the contrary, string stents caused less pain at extraction. All the aforementioned differences did not reach statistical difference. PMID: 31086133 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Minerva Urol Nefrol Source Type: research
Kidney stone disease afflicts approximately 1 in 11 Americans in their lifetime,1 similar to the prevalence of diabetes. Over the past few decades, disease prevalence has dramatically risen in all demographic groups, especially among women, children, and nonwhites.1,2 The clinical hallmark of kidney stone disease is severe pain from a symptomatic episode, to which all stone formers can invariably attest. Additional sequelae may include acute kidney injury, urinary tract infection, lower urinary tract symptoms, and, less often, progressive renal decline over time.
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusions: The frequency of urolithiasis in these pediatric patients was similar to that reported by the literature. A metabolic evaluation is required and the composition of stones should be better evaluated.
Source: Revista Paulista de Pediatria - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Thrombocyte level was positively correlated with eGFR but was not associated with presence of PKD-related symptoms, suggesting thrombocyte level might be an independent serum biomarker for disease progression. Hypertension was associated with increased risk of symptom occurrence, indicating the relationship between hypertension and disease progression. This study reveals the clinical characteristics of inpatients with ADPKD in China and provides clinicians with useful insights into this intractable disease. PMID: 30219820 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
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