Study: MMR Vaccine Does Not Cause Autism

BOSTON (CBS) — A new large study should reassure parents there is no link between the measles, mumps, rubella vaccine, and autism. Unfortunately, despite all of the evidence to the contrary, there are some parents who still worry that getting the shot will trigger autism in their children. This new study should finally put the issue to rest. Researchers looked at more than a half million children born in Denmark over 10 years. They found absolutely no increased risk of developing autism after getting the MMR vaccine. They also found that even in children at risk, the vaccine did not trigger autism in those kids. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared “vaccine hesitancy” as one of the top 10 threats to global health, and resistance to getting the MMR vaccine, specifically, has led to several recent measles outbreaks in the United States and abroad.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Autism Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV MMR Vaccine Source Type: news

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The Ohio teenager who made headlines for getting vaccinated against his mother’s wishes told the Senate on Tuesday that spreading vaccine misinformation is dangerous — but urged the public not to vilify those who do so. “Approaching this issue with the concern of education and addressing misinformation properly can cause change, as it did for me,” 18-year-old Ethan Lindenberger said while testifying before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday. “Although the debate around vaccines is not necessarily centered around information, and concerns for health and sa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime vaccines Source Type: news
Amid ongoing U.S. measles outbreaks, one of the largest studies to date provides fresh evidence that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine does not cause autism.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this study, the scientists addressed some potential criticisms of how previous studies were designed in order to provide additional evidence to inform concerned parents. “We see vaccine skepticism growing,” says the study’s lead author Anders Hviid, an investigator at the Statens Serum Institut, the national public health organization in Denmark. “So we thought it was a good idea to revisit the hypothesis and try to get scientific answers to the different criticisms from skeptics of the original study.” Hviid and his colleagues analyzed data involving more than 650,000 children born in Den...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
MONDAY, March 4, 2019 -- Amid ongoing U.S. measles outbreaks, one of the largest studies to date provides fresh evidence that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine does not cause autism. Danish researchers found no link between the MMR...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Fear, based on the perceived risk that vaccination will lead to autism, among Somali mothers in Tensta and Rinkeby is evident and influenced by the opinions of friends and relatives. Child Healthcare Center nurses are important in the decision-making process regarding acceptance of MMR vaccination. There is a need to address mothers’ concerns regarding vaccine safety while improving the approach of nurses as they address these concerns.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Italy’s parliament shocked the scientific community on Tuesday by voting to lift a legal requirement that parents vaccinate their children before sending them to pre-school. The move, driven by Italy’s new populist coalition government, has been widely criticized by doctors, who say vaccinations are essential to avoiding outbreaks of serious diseases like measles. Here’s what to know about the Italian government’s decision: What did the Italian government do with vaccines? Italian lawmakers in the upper house of parliament voted 148 to 110 to amend a law that required children under the age of 6 to...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Anti-Vaccines Italy Source Type: news
One of the most contentious areas of health policy over the past two decades has been the safety of vaccination. Vaccines prevent the outbreak of diseases that used to be widespread, like polio, and scientific consensus strongly supports their safety. Yet many Americans refuse or delay the vaccination of their children out of fear that it could lead to autism, even though scientific consensus refutes this claim. Anti-vaccine attitudes have been fueled in large part by growing rates of autism diagnoses as well as a now debunked study in The Lancet that linked autism and the measles mumps rubella (MMR) vaccine – pushin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
Yes, you should vaccinate your pets. And no, they can’t get autism. That’s the surreal message the British Veterinary Association (BVA) is pushing out to pet owners. It comes amid a mounting trend of individuals who refuse to vaccinate their dogs due to a mistaken belief that shots can cause autism. This theory — which originally stems from a widely discredited and later retracted 1998 study that purported to find a link between autism and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine — has been repeatedly disproven in humans, and has no scientific basis when it comes to animals. “There’s currently ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Autism healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Anti-vaccination headlines—like “HPV vaccine leaves another 17-year-old-girl paralyzed”—populate the Internet. That, and “Mom researches vaccines, discovers vaccination horrors, goes vaccine free,” are just a few examples of the fake science news stories shared this month on Facebook. If you are a parent on social media, you’ve likely seen many posts just like these. Maybe you’ve even clicked on one, curious. What’s the harm, right? As a family physician with four decades of experience fighting preventable disease around the globe and a professor of anthropology, risk a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news
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