The Unrecognized Lesson of " Meth Crisis 2.0 "

On February 21, Charles Fain Lehman wrote an important  column in the Wall Street Journal alerting the public to the alarming rise in methamphetamine-related deaths in recent years. This has been occurring under our noses while the press and lawmakers focus their attention on overdoses related to opioids. He correctly tells readers that the recrudescent meth crisis, which I like to call “Meth Crisis 2.0: The Mexican Connection,” came about after lawmakers addressed “Meth Crisis 1.0” in 2005 with the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act. That Act made it much harder for allergy sufferers to get the effective decongestant Sudafed by restricting its sales and making it “behin d-the-counter” (in Oregon and Mississippi it was made prescription-only) and conducting a military-like crackdown on homegrown meth labs that had organically sprung up in neighborhoods across the country. Lehman then describes how the Mexican cartels quickly stepped in to fill the void and now su pply meth users at record levels.The US pressured Mexico into restricting domestic Sudafed sales, but the cartels quickly shifted to phenyl-2-propanone ( “P2P”) to make their meth.As I read his column, I kept thinking “he is about to explain that this is an example of why prohibition never works—it just drives the prohibited activity underground and makes it more dangerous.” Unfortunately, rather than indicting prohibition, he...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs

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This is my second post just clarifying the cultural background and what is appropriate to put down in the AMCAS. What kind of experiences make you Mexican, for example? Is it just having a genetic lineage to Mexico, or is it more of cultural experience (i.e. if you are white but lived/grew up in Mexico for 10 years). Would both be considered Latino/Hispanic? Again, just asking questions for others who might have them. I am not saying this applies to me.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pre-Medical - MD Source Type: forums
To show the success obtained in the development of a low cost modified technique for neovagina by traction and use of balloon with laparoscopic assistance, based on anatomical and functional results.
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Virtual Poster Session 1: Laparoscopy (10:40 AM — 10:50 AM) 10:40 AM: STATION J Source Type: research
By COLIN KONSCHAK, FACHE and DAVE LEVIN, MD Dave Levin Colin Konschak The opioid crisis in the United States is having a devastating impact on individuals, their families, and the health care industry. This multi-part series will focus on the role technology can play in addressing this crisis. Part one of the series proposed a strategic framework for evaluating and pursuing technical solutions. A Framework for Innovation As noted in part one of our series, we believe the opioid crisis is an “All Hands-On Deck” moment and health IT (HIT) has a lot to offer. Given the many different possibilities, having a method...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Data Tech THCB APIs clinical support Colin Konschak Dave Levin Opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs
​The atomizer is a handy tool to instill life-saving medication into the nose, and you should consider stocking them if you don't already. An atomizer can be used to administer naloxone and countless other drugs as well as for moderate sedation and pain control. Pediatric and adult patients alike can benefit from intranasal fentanyl or Versed. Studies on intranasal epinephrine for anaphylaxis also look promising, but it does require a higher dose—5 mg instead of 0.3 mg. (Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016;34[1]:38; http://bit.ly/2Prpjhb.)The atomizer is easy to use and can be attached to any syringe. Each spray creat...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Robert R. Redfield, M.D., director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will deliver the 2018 Joseph J. Kinyoun Memorial Lecture on the intersection between the national opioid crisis and the management of infectious diseases. Titled, “ Opioids: Epidemic of Our Time and Impact on Infectious Disease, ” Dr. Redfield ’ s talk will explore the impacts of the unprecedented use of opioids in the United States on the management of infectious diseases. While overdose remains the leading cause of death among people who use opioids, this population is also disproportionately affected by viral he...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
The opioid epidemic of the last 20 years has served to illustrate the powerful addictive properties of anything that binds to opioid receptors of the human brain. Lives are ruined by opioid addiction, more than 100 deaths now occurring every day from overdose as people either take more and more to overcome the partial tolerance or new potent drugs like fentanyl make their way into street versions. Drugs such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and fentanyl bind to the brain’s opioid receptors provoking a “high” while causing the user to desire more opioids as partial tolerance develops. And make no mistake: Much o...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle addiction addictive eating disorder opiates opioids undoctored Source Type: blogs
A coalition of 41 states' attorneys general have served five major opioid manufacturers with subpoenas seeking information about how these companies marketed and sold prescription opioids. The coalition is also demanding documents and information related to distribution practices from three drug distributors. The investigative subpoenas and document requests were sent to pharmaceutical manufacturers Endo International, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd./Cephalon Inc. and Allergan. The group also served a supplemental investigative subpoena to Purdue Pharma. Documents were also requested of three ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
After many months of debate, both chambers of Congress passed the FDA User Fee Package. This comes after the Senate passed its bill (S. 934) which cleared the Senate HELP Committee in May on a bipartisan basis. The House passed its bill on July 13 (H.R. 2430). The FDA Reauthorization Act (FDARA) renews and enhances the FDA drug, medical-device, biosimilar, and generic-drug user-fee provisions. The bill was uniquely tied to “Right to Try” legislation, and the Senate also passed bipartisan legislation on the opioid epidemic. Senate FDARA Bill The politics of the bill were intricately locked in with another memb...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
After a fairly slow 2016, the United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (OPDP) issued a quick burst of letters in the span of nine days in December. This flurry of activity more than doubled the enforcement letters that had been issued up to that point in the year. Although there was an apparent increase in enforcement activity in December (perhaps related to the new Administration and the mark the old Administration wanted to leave on the industry), the type of activity and the nature of Draft Guidances issued in 2017 prior to the Trump Administration taking office ind...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
A health leader from Colorado’s stunningly beautiful but economically challenged San Luis Valley sobered an afternoon crowd by declaring that his rural community was “flirting with an epidemic” of opioid overdoses and deaths. Hours later, statewide experts called that assessment of substance use in the West too optimistic. “It’s more like a shotgun wedding with an epidemic,” pronounced Robert Valuck, an epidemiologist, professor at the University of Colorado Denver Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and coordinator of the Colorado Consortium for Prescription Drug Abus...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured GrantWatch Public Health addiction Colorado Health Symposium Consumers Emergency departments Health Philanthropy Health Promotion and Disease PreventionGW Hospitals marijuana opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs
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