Tiny wireless sensors could revolutionize how premature babies are monitored

Tiny wireless skin sensors are being tested to monitor stroke recovery and breathing disorders, but they could also help babies who are born prematurely, according to a new study in the journal Science. The skin-like silicon patches attach to the chest and foot proved just as reliable as traditional electrodes for tracking babies' heart and respiration rates, temperature, blood pressure and blood-oxygen level. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionsPatients with CMS were more likely to present with increased comorbidities. Patients with CMS undergoing CABG were at risk for worse short ‐term secondary postoperative outcomes and reduced long‐term survival. The data supports the need for further investigation for risk reduction surrounding operative revascularization.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Balance and ambulation are the result of a multicomponent control process through the interaction of the sensory and motor information. Despite the clinical relevance of the somatosensory system, its role has not drawn much attention from clinical research...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
Condition:   Stroke Interventions:   Device: WBPC;   Device: Without WBPC Sponsor:   Changhua Christian Hospital Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Stroke Interventions:   Behavioral: Digital cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia;   Behavioral: Sleep hygiene information Sponsors:   University of Oxford;   Big Health Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
(Florida Atlantic University) New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
What if markings on your skin could unlock your phone or get you access to entrance doors? And what if they could also measure your blood pressure or hydration level constantly in the background only alerting you in case of values out of the normal range? Digital tattoos could act as minilabs rendering our skin an interactive display and making healthcare more invisible at the same time. Here’s our summary of the latest trends and research efforts to make it happen. Our bodies are the next frontier for technology In the course of the development of medical devices, a general trend has emerged: tools are getting more...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Patients digital digital health digital tattoo digital tattoos future Innovation Personalized medicine technology wearables Source Type: blogs
We reported a surge in the use of augmented reality in healthcare at the end of 2016, with the trend continuing in 2017. Notably, Microsoft’s HoloLens was successfully used for spinal surgery applications by a surgical navigation company named ...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
Author Affiliations open 1Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 2Center on Clinical and Epidemiological Eye Research, Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 3Center on the Early Life Origins of Disease, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 5Channing ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
What is a social admit to the hospital?   A social admission is generally accepted by healthcare professionals to be a patient with no acute medical needs that is brought into a hospital because no safe discharge arrangements could be made at the time they presented. Most social admits involve elderly patients who present to an emergency room with weakness, have a thorough negative workup and are too weak to go home but have no where else to go. They might have a non surgical fracture limiting their mobility or a family refusing to take them home. Most social admissions occur after-hours when community services are un...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Source Type: blogs
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