Tiny wireless sensors could revolutionize how premature babies are monitored

Tiny wireless skin sensors are being tested to monitor stroke recovery and breathing disorders, but they could also help babies who are born prematurely, according to a new study in the journal Science. The skin-like silicon patches attach to the chest and foot proved just as reliable as traditional electrodes for tracking babies' heart and respiration rates, temperature, blood pressure and blood-oxygen level. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Gil JA, Goodman AD, Kleiner J, Walsh DF, Kosinski LR, Hsu R Abstract INTRODUCTION: The incidence of geriatric ankle fractures is rising. With the substantial variation in the physiologic and functional status within this age group, our null hypothesis was that mortality and complications of open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) between patients who are aged 65 to 79 are equivalent to ORIF in patients who are aged 80 to 89. METHODS: Patients with ankle fracture were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. Patients treate...
Source: The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Am Acad Orthop Surg Source Type: research
Authors: Schmidt T, Simske NM, Audet MA, Benedick A, Kim CY, Vallier HA Abstract INTRODUCTION: It is well known that patients with diabetes mellitus experience higher complication rates after torsional ankle fracture; however, the functional consequences remain less clear. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of diabetes on complications, secondary operations, and functional outcomes after torsional ankle fracture. METHODS: Nine hundred seventy-nine adult patients treated surgically for a torsional ankle injury (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 44B, 44C) over 13 years were retrospectively reviewed....
Source: The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Am Acad Orthop Surg Source Type: research
PURPOSE: The overall purpose of this study was to explore participants' and physiotherapists' experiences regarding the acceptability, implementation, and practicality of a novel group-based multifactorial falls prevention activity programme for community-...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: The FOIS was robustly associated with indicators of dysphagia. However, associations with postural control, wakefulness, age and diagnosis highlights that tube feeding may be attributed to other issues than dysphagia. It should be further investigated whether FOIS level 4 is meaningful in neurorehabilitation. PMID: 32772736 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Brain Injury - Category: Neurology Tags: Brain Inj Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our results not only developed a deeper understanding of the role of CCL2 in human brain astrocytes but also provided novel insight into potential treatments for ischemic stroke. PMID: 32749897 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Brain Injury - Category: Neurology Tags: Brain Inj Source Type: research
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
What if markings on your skin could unlock your phone or get you access to entrance doors? And what if they could also measure your blood pressure or hydration level constantly in the background only alerting you in case of values out of the normal range? Digital tattoos could act as minilabs rendering our skin an interactive display and making healthcare more invisible at the same time. Here’s our summary of the latest trends and research efforts to make it happen. Our bodies are the next frontier for technology In the course of the development of medical devices, a general trend has emerged: tools are getting more...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Patients digital digital health digital tattoo digital tattoos future Innovation Personalized medicine technology wearables Source Type: blogs
We reported a surge in the use of augmented reality in healthcare at the end of 2016, with the trend continuing in 2017. Notably, Microsoft’s HoloLens was successfully used for spinal surgery applications by a surgical navigation company named ...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
Author Affiliations open 1Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 2Center on Clinical and Epidemiological Eye Research, Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 3Center on the Early Life Origins of Disease, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 5Channing ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
What is a social admit to the hospital?   A social admission is generally accepted by healthcare professionals to be a patient with no acute medical needs that is brought into a hospital because no safe discharge arrangements could be made at the time they presented. Most social admits involve elderly patients who present to an emergency room with weakness, have a thorough negative workup and are too weak to go home but have no where else to go. They might have a non surgical fracture limiting their mobility or a family refusing to take them home. Most social admissions occur after-hours when community services are un...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Source Type: blogs
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