Tiny wireless sensors could revolutionize how premature babies are monitored

Tiny wireless skin sensors are being tested to monitor stroke recovery and breathing disorders, but they could also help babies who are born prematurely, according to a new study in the journal Science. The skin-like silicon patches attach to the chest and foot proved just as reliable as traditional electrodes for tracking babies' heart and respiration rates, temperature, blood pressure and blood-oxygen level. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract: Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy that affects approximately 4% of pregnancies. Preeclampsia is defined as new-onset hypertension after 20 weeks gestation often accompanied by new-onset proteinuria. Women who experience preeclampsia during pregnancy are at an increased risk for hypertension and stroke later in life. Healthcare providers should screen women appropriately to minimize risk.
Source: The Nurse Practitioner - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: WOMEN'S HEALTH: DNP SPECIAL ISSUE Source Type: research
Post-stroke depression has been previously associated with poorer recovery, but new research suggests depression may also be a risk factor for stroke.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
The rate of older black and white people who receive Medicare benefits and die after an initial stroke has fallen over the last 25 years, a new study says.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Christine Smith, Mingxu Sun, Laurence Kenney, David Howard, Helen Luckie, Karen Waring, Paul Taylor, Earl Merson, Stacey Finn, Sarah Cotterill
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Among stroke patients in ICU, we identified significant risk factors of stroke-associated AKI. Serum CysC level at ICU admission was an important biomarker for predicting AKI and 28-day mortality.Blood Purif
Source: Blood Purification - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Abstract A preterm, low birth weight (1.45 kg) baby boy, delivered at 32 weeks, was admitted to the neonatal ICU with a low APGAR score assessment of Activity/muscle tone, Pulse/heart rate, Grimace, Appearance, and Respiration. Each criterion is graded from 0 to 2, and a final score is obtained by their sum (0-10). Our patient had a score of 3; poor feeding; failure to thrive; and a red, scaly skin eruption on the face and extremities. Physical examination showed erythematous, crusted lesions over the forehead, cheeks, neck, and arms. His mother had a history of two spontaneous abortions in the previous 2 years an...
Source: Skinmed - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Skinmed Source Type: research
What if markings on your skin could unlock your phone or get you access to entrance doors? And what if they could also measure your blood pressure or hydration level constantly in the background only alerting you in case of values out of the normal range? Digital tattoos could act as minilabs rendering our skin an interactive display and making healthcare more invisible at the same time. Here’s our summary of the latest trends and research efforts to make it happen. Our bodies are the next frontier for technology In the course of the development of medical devices, a general trend has emerged: tools are getting more...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Patients digital digital health digital tattoo digital tattoos future Innovation Personalized medicine technology wearables Source Type: blogs
We reported a surge in the use of augmented reality in healthcare at the end of 2016, with the trend continuing in 2017. Notably, Microsoft’s HoloLens was successfully used for spinal surgery applications by a surgical navigation company named ...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
Author Affiliations open 1Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 2Center on Clinical and Epidemiological Eye Research, Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 3Center on the Early Life Origins of Disease, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 5Channing ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
What is a social admit to the hospital?   A social admission is generally accepted by healthcare professionals to be a patient with no acute medical needs that is brought into a hospital because no safe discharge arrangements could be made at the time they presented. Most social admits involve elderly patients who present to an emergency room with weakness, have a thorough negative workup and are too weak to go home but have no where else to go. They might have a non surgical fracture limiting their mobility or a family refusing to take them home. Most social admissions occur after-hours when community services are un...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Source Type: blogs
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