Catechins in green tea found to improve symptoms of metabolic syndrome in obese people

(Natural News) Japanese scientists have found more reasons for people to enjoy their daily cup of tea. Their study, which was published in the journal Nutrition Research, showed that catechins found in green tea can improve metabolic syndrome and reduce abdominal fat in obese and overweight individuals. More than 34 percent of adults in the U.S....
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Nour A. Al-Sawalha, Osama Y. Alshogran, Mofleh S. Awawdeh, Basima A. AlmomaniAbstractAimsThe prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is increasing in several countries. The MetS is characterized by the occurrence of at least three of the following risk factors: decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increased blood pressure, raised fasting blood glucose, elevated triglycerides, and abdominal obesity. There is a growing evidence of the role of l-carnosine in improving lipid profile and enhancement of the antioxidant activity. However,...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 October 2019Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Guillermo Mena-Sánchez, Nancy Babio, Nerea Becerra-Tomás, Miguel Ángel Martínez-González, Andrés Díaz-López, Dolores Corella, Maria Dolores Zomeño, Dora Romaguera, Jesús Vioque, Ángel M. Alonso-Gómez, Julia Wärnberg, J. Alfredo Martínez, Luís Serra-Majem, Ramon Estruch, Rosa Bernal, José Lapetra, Xavier Pintó, Josep A. Tur, José Lopez-Miranda, Naomi Cano-IbáñezAbstractBac...
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
ConclusionOLE exerts beneficial effects in HFD-induced obesity in mice, which was associated to an improvement in plasma and tissue metabolic profile, inflammatory status, gut microbiota composition and vascular dysfunction.Graphical abstract
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Yury Yu Borshchev, Yury P. Uspensky, Michael M. GalagudzaAbstractThe prevalence of dementia worldwide is growing at an alarming rate. A number of studies and meta-analyses have provided evidence for increased risk of dementia in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) as compared to persons without MS. However, there are some reports demonstrating a lack of association between MS and increased dementia risk. In this review, taking into account the potential role of individual MS components in the pathogenesis of MS-related cognitive dysfunction...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
This study enrolled 14983 eligible subjects stratified into metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW), metabolically healthy overweight (MHOW), metabolically healthy obesity (MHO), metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUNW), metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUOW), and metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUO) according to body mass index and metabolic syndrome status (ATP-III criteria). The metabolic healthy phenotype was defined as the absence of both metabolic syndrome and any known diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, hypertension or dyslipidemia. Early and advanced CKD were defined as eGFR
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
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