Ixodes ricinus infesting snakes: Insights on a new tick-host association in a Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato endemic area.

Ixodes ricinus infesting snakes: Insights on a new tick-host association in a Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato endemic area. Acta Trop. 2019 Feb 19;: Authors: Mendoza-Roldan JA, Colella V Abstract The castor bean tick Ixodes ricinus is one of the most abundant tick species in Europe, being able to parasitize a wide number of vertebrate hosts, including mammals, birds, and reptiles. This tick species has an important role as vector of zoonotic pathogens, including the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis (i.e. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato). Here, we provide insights on a new tick-host association (i.e. I. ricinus infesting snakes) in an area recently recognized as endemic for reptile-associated zoonotic species of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l.. PMID: 30794772 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated lower than expected seroprotection against measles among vaccinated children. Understanding the factors that affect host immunity to measles will aid in developing more efficient and effective immunization programs in DRC. PMID: 32057333 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
ConclusionTuberculous mastitis is extremely rare variant of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. However, it should be kept in the mind of physicians and pathologists while approaching a breast mass, especially in endemic area.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Hridesh Mishra, Byron W P Reeve, Zaida Palmer, Judy Caldwell, Tania Dolby, Charissa C Naidoo, Jennifer G Jackson, Samuel G Schumacher, Claudia M Denkinger, Andreas H Diacon, Paul D van Helden, Florian M Marx, Robin M Warren, Grant TheronSummaryBackgroundXpert MTB/RIF Ultra (Ultra) is a new test for tuberculosis undergoing global roll-out. We assessed the performance of Ultra compared with Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) in an HIV-endemic setting where previous tuberculosis is frequent and current test performance is suboptimal.Method...
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is caused by inhaling airborne spores of the fungus Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii. Residing in or traveling to areas endemic for Coccidioides is required for the diagnosis; no person-to-person or zoonotic contagion occurs. The incidence of coccidioidomycosis is increasing in endemic areas, and it has been identified as the cause of as many as 17% to 29% of all cases of community-acquired pneumonia in some regions. Obtaining a travel history is recommended when evaluating patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis usually relie...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
In this study, no difference was found between the presence of C.psittaci in pigeon droppings and season. In addition when the sequence analysis of the isolated samples were compared with the World database; all isolates were found to be 100% genotype B and 99% genotype E. In this study, the sequence analysis of the ompA gene of C.psittaci from domestic pigeon feces was determined for the first time in Turkey. Although the presence of C.psittaci in domestic pigeons is low, it is a zoonotic bacterium and is important for the public health. PMID: 32050885 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni - Category: Microbiology Tags: Mikrobiyol Bul Source Type: research
Authors: Çelebi B, Bakkaloğlu Z, Ünaldı Ö, Karagöz A, Kılıç S, Durmaz R Abstract Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative, coccobasillus, facultative intracellular bacteria and causes a zoonotic disease, tularemia in humans. F.tularensis has four subspecies, which have different virulences for humans as F.tularensis subsp. tularensis, F.tularensis subsp. holarctica, F.tularensis subsp. mediasiatica and F.tularensis subsp. novicida. F.tularensis subsp. tularensis is the most virulent subspecies and mortality rate is high in human cases. F.tularensis subsp. holarctica, which has been...
Source: Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni - Category: Microbiology Tags: Mikrobiyol Bul Source Type: research
In this study, the major factors underlying synonymous codon‐related amino acid usage in the B. burgdorferi genome and bias in synonymous codon usage of the translation initiation region of coding sequences were analyzed. Additionally, adaptation of B. burgdorferi to several of its hosts was analyzed in the context of synonymous codon usage. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that nucleotide content at the third synonymous position of a codon influenced the synonymous codon usage pattern, but the strand‐specific factor did not influence the synonymous codon usage pattern of B. burgdorferi. In terms of the low ...
Source: Journal of Basic Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH PAPER Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our results highlight the potential for climate change to have an effect on future Lyme disease risk in Canada even if the Paris Agreement’s goal to keep global warming below 2°C is achieved, although mitigation reducing emissions from RCP8.5 levels to those of RCP6.0 or less would be expected to slow tick invasion after the 2030s. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP57 Received: 02 March 2016 Revised: 26 August 2016 Accepted: 30 August 2016 Published: 31 May 2017 Address correspondence to H. Beltrami, Earth Science Department, Physical Sciences Center, PO Box 5000, 1 West St, Antigonish, NS B2G 1W5. Tel...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Summary The spirochaete (Borrelia burgdorferi) associated with Lyme disease was detected in questing ticks and rodents during a period of 18 years, 1991–2009, at five locations on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The black‐legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) was collected at varied intervals between 1991 and 2009 and examined for B. burgdorferi. The white‐footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), house mouse (Mus musculus) marsh rice rat (Oryzomys palustris), marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris), eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) and six‐lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineatus) were live‐trapped...
Source: Zoonoses and Public Health - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conclusions: These results emphasize the need for follow-up investigations to determine whether the identified spatial pattern is due to: clustering of misdiagnosed cases, clustering of patients with an out-of state travel history, or presence of a clustered unknown enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi in Texas. This would enable an improved surveillance and reporting of LD in Texas.
Source: BMC Public Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: research
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