FDA Head Says the Federal Government May Have to Set Vaccine Policies If State Laws Continue to Allow Outbreaks

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the federal government might someday regulate vaccine policies if “lax” state vaccine laws “force [its] hand” by allowing the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles to continue. Vaccine laws are currently decided at the state level. While all 50 states require certain vaccines for students, all but three — California, Mississippi and West Virginia — allow non-medical exemptions for people who have either religious or philosophical beliefs contrary to vaccination. But with preventable diseases like measles popping up with new force — especially in states with widespread vaccine exemptions, such as Washington — Gottlieb told Axios that the federal government may have to step in. Measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000 but has been creeping back due to gaps in vaccine coverage. Seventeen measles outbreaks were recorded in the U.S. last year, contributing to a total of 372 reported cases, and 127 cases in 10 states have been recorded so far in 2019. “It’s an avoidable tragedy,” Gottlieb told Axios. “Too many states have lax laws.” Speaking with CNN, Gottlieb added that some states’ widespread exemptions are “creating the opportunity for outbreaks on a scale that is going to have national implications” and could “force the hand of the federal health agencies.” Gottlieb&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

Related Links:

TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the s...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Abstract The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that children be vaccinated against 14 potentially serious illnesses during the first 24 months of life (1). CDC used data from the National Immunization Survey-Child (NIS-Child) to assess vaccination coverage with the recommended number of doses of each vaccine at the national, state, territorial, and selected local levels* among children born in 2015 and 2016. Coverage by age 24 months was at least 90% nationally for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vac...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
In conclusion, European countries now have more comprehensive national vaccination programs for HCP, however there are still gaps. Given the recent large outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe and the occupational risk for HCP, vaccination policies need to be expanded and strengthened in several European countries. Overall, vaccination policies for HCP in Europe should be periodically re-evaluated in order to provide optimal protection against vaccine-preventable diseases and infection control within healthcare facilities for HCP and patients. PMID: 31623916 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Carter Roberts’ motorized wheelchair didn’t arrive until the day he died. It had been a long time coming and his parents had fought hard to get it. The chair cost more than $32,000 and the insurance companies wouldn’t cover it, so the family went to court. One insurer eventually agreed to pay for some components of the chair but not the whole thing. And then none of it mattered anyway. On Sept. 22, 2018, the Roberts’ doorbell rang and the chair was delivered. Also on Sept. 22, 2018, Carter died, just three months shy of his sixth birthday. He had been largely paralyzed for the final two years of his...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease viruses Source Type: news
Lawmakers in Germany are considering a new law that would fine parents if their children aren’t vaccinated against measles. The Guardian reports that the draft law would make vaccinations mandatory for any child attending nurseries or schools, as well as teachers, educators and medical staff. Failure to comply could result in fines of up to US$2,800. If approved this year, the law would go into effect by March 1, 2022, and would require parents to provide proof of their children’s vaccination by mid-2020. The proposed measure comes amid a global resurgence of the respiratory illness that has been driven in part...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Germany onetime overnight Source Type: news
Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions Apart West Nile virus (78), thousands of congenital microcephaly cases, fetal brain tissue damage and neurological syndromes have been associated with ZIKV infection. Unfortunately, the epidemics of this mosquito born, and a relative stable virus is on a rise. Although congenital microcephaly is a rare disorder however, due to lack of standardized diagnostic test facilities, the incidence in the geographically widespread ZIKV epidemic regions is higher. Animals studies showed that ZIKV is a neurotropic virus. It directly targets the developing embryonic brain cells by inducing apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The Scholars of the Podcast reveal ribosomal proteins encoded in viral genomes, and a protein cell receptor for bat influenza viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode European Congress of Virology 2019 ASM Clinical Virology Symposium Intel ISEF judges needed Roald Dahl endorses measles vaccine Viruses encode ribosomal proteins (Nat Commun) Bat influenza virus receptor (Nature) Going to bat for flu research (TWiV 173)...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Felicia D. Goodrum Sterling Heidi L. Pottinger By FELICIA D. GOODRUM STERLING, PhD and HEIDI L. POTTINGER, DrPH, MPH, MA The measles outbreak in Washington state this week has brought new attention to the anti-vaccine movement.  In fact, the World Health Organization recently identified “vaccine hesitancy” as one of top threats to global health. In the US, the number of unvaccinated children has quadrupled since 2001, enabling the resurgence of infectious diseases long-since controlled.  In fact, the WHO claims a staggering 1.5 million deaths could be prevented worldwide by improved vaccination rates....
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Patients Felicia Goodrum Sterling Global Health Heidi L. Pottinger public health The OpEd Project vaccines Source Type: blogs
More News: Academies | Allergy & Immunology | American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) | American Medical Association (AMA) | Bulgaria Health | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Croatia Health | Czechia Health | Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | France Health | Government | Greece Health | Health | Hungary Health | Infectious Diseases | Influenza | Influenza Vaccine | International Medicine & Public Health | Italy Health | Latvia Health | Legislation | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Outbreaks | Pediatrics | Poland Health | Slovakia Health | Students | Universities & Medical Training | Vaccines | WHO