FDA Head Says the Federal Government May Have to Set Vaccine Policies If State Laws Continue to Allow Outbreaks

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the federal government might someday regulate vaccine policies if “lax” state vaccine laws “force [its] hand” by allowing the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles to continue. Vaccine laws are currently decided at the state level. While all 50 states require certain vaccines for students, all but three — California, Mississippi and West Virginia — allow non-medical exemptions for people who have either religious or philosophical beliefs contrary to vaccination. But with preventable diseases like measles popping up with new force — especially in states with widespread vaccine exemptions, such as Washington — Gottlieb told Axios that the federal government may have to step in. Measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. in 2000 but has been creeping back due to gaps in vaccine coverage. Seventeen measles outbreaks were recorded in the U.S. last year, contributing to a total of 372 reported cases, and 127 cases in 10 states have been recorded so far in 2019. “It’s an avoidable tragedy,” Gottlieb told Axios. “Too many states have lax laws.” Speaking with CNN, Gottlieb added that some states’ widespread exemptions are “creating the opportunity for outbreaks on a scale that is going to have national implications” and could “force the hand of the federal health agencies.” Gottlieb&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

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The Scholars of the Podcast reveal ribosomal proteins encoded in viral genomes, and a protein cell receptor for bat influenza viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode European Congress of Virology 2019 ASM Clinical Virology Symposium Intel ISEF judges needed Roald Dahl endorses measles vaccine Viruses encode ribosomal proteins (Nat Commun) Bat influenza virus receptor (Nature) Going to bat for flu research (TWiV 173)...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Felicia D. Goodrum Sterling Heidi L. Pottinger By FELICIA D. GOODRUM STERLING, PhD and HEIDI L. POTTINGER, DrPH, MPH, MA The measles outbreak in Washington state this week has brought new attention to the anti-vaccine movement.  In fact, the World Health Organization recently identified “vaccine hesitancy” as one of top threats to global health. In the US, the number of unvaccinated children has quadrupled since 2001, enabling the resurgence of infectious diseases long-since controlled.  In fact, the WHO claims a staggering 1.5 million deaths could be prevented worldwide by improved vaccination rates....
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Patients Felicia Goodrum Sterling Global Health Heidi L. Pottinger public health The OpEd Project vaccines Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
A pair of airline health scares last week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 milli...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Travel Source Type: news
A pair of airline health scares this week were related to the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, officials say. Eleven people were treated at a New York City hospital after reports of sick passengers and crew on an Emirates flight from Dubai on Wednesday. The next day, a total of 12 passengers on two flights into Philadelphia International Airport showed flu-like symptoms. “Overall, the common thread is influenza A cases in returning Hajj pilgrims,” Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) spokesman Benjamin Haynes told TIME. The hajj, an annual pilgrimage for practicing Muslims, this year reportedly drew more than 2 milli...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Travel Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewMass gatherings (MGs) are characterized by a high concentration of people at a specific time and location. Infectious diseases are of particular concern at MGs. The aim of this review was to summarize findings in the field of infectious diseases with a variety of pathogens associated with international MGs in the last 5  years.Recent FindingsIn the context of Hajj, one of the largest religious MGs at Mecca, Saudi Arabia, respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of infectious diseases in pilgrims with a prevalence of 50 –93%. The most commonly acquired respiratory viruses were h...
Source: Current Infectious Disease Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On e...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: The proposed scheme can successfully classify the public’s opinions and emotions in multiple dimensions, which would facilitate the timely understanding of public perceptions during the outbreak of an infectious disease. Compared with conventional machine learning methods, our CNN models showed superiority on measles-related tweet classification tasks with a relatively small and highly unbalanced gold standard. With the success of these tasks, our proposed scheme and CNN-based tweets classification system is expected to be useful for the analysis of tweets about other infectious diseases such as influenza and Ebola.
Source: Journal of Medical Internet Research - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This review proves that vaccine hysteria is detrimental because: 1) it causes an increased morbidity and mortality from preventable diseases; 2) it jeopardizes research for new vaccines; 3) patients are reluctant to accept any form of immune-therapy, commonly referred to as "vaccination". PMID: 29773050 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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