Getting too little sleep raises heart disease risks by letting plaques build in blood vessels

A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital has found that not getting enough sleep raises levels of two types of white blood cells that build blockages in blood vessels.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSION: Traffic noise, and air-traffic noise in particular, is an important cardiovascular risk factor that has not been sufficiently studied to date. Preventive measures are needed to protect the population from the harmful effects of noise on health. PMID: 31092312 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Deutsches Arzteblatt International - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dtsch Arztebl Int Source Type: research
“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- It sounds like something out of a horror film: A blood-hungry insect feeds on its prey's faces while they sleep, leaving behind a parasite that can cause stroke and heart disease. But the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
We examined 42 healthy female physique athletes (age 27.5 ± 4.0 years, body mass index 23.4 ± 1.7 kg/m2) volunteered into either a diet group (n = 25) or a control group (n = 17). For the diet group, the energy intake was reduced and exercise levels were increased to induce loss of fat mass that was subsequently regained during a recovery period. The control group was instructed to maintain their typical lifestyle, exercise levels, and energy intake at a constant level. For quantification of systems biology markers, fasting blood samples were drawn at three time points: baseline (PRE), at the end of the weigh...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, researchers aimed to determine the association between sedentary behavior and physical activity on mortality and to estimate the effects of replacing sitting with standing, physical activity and sleep. Participants included 149,077 Australian men and women aged 45 years and older who were asked to complete a questionnaire that determined how many hours per day an individual spent sitting, standing and sleeping. They also were questioned about the total time spent walking or participating in moderate or vigorous physical activity. After a median follow up time of 8.9 years for all-cause mortality and 7...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Anxiety is part of life. You feel it when you’re stuck in traffic, harried at work or worrying about your family and finances. There’s no doubt that feeling anxious can elevate your blood pressure, at least in the short term. “Our mind and our thoughts certainly are connected to our hearts,” says Dr. Christopher Celano, associate director of the Cardiac Psychiatry Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. When something makes you anxious—whether it’s a life-threatening emergency or persistent worry—your sympathetic nervous system initiates a fight-or-flight response that ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
Sara AlMarabeh, Mohammed H. Abdulla and Ken D. O'Halloran* Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Renal sensory nerves are important in the regulation of body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis, and blood pressure. Activation of renal mechanoreceptor afferents triggers a negative feedback reno-renal reflex that leads to the inhibition of sympathetic nervous outflow. Conversely, activation of renal chemoreceptor afferents elicits reflex sympathoexcitation. Dysregulation of reno-renal reflexes by suppression of the inhibitory refle...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
April is Stress Awareness Month. When I first read that in a local newspaper, my response was “Really? As if we’re not all very well-aware that we are stressed — sometimes to the max. Do we really need a month to focus on it? Then I read what it’s actually about: April as Stress Awareness Month was initiated by the Health Resource Network in 1992 to encourage health organizations to develop and distribute educational materials and hold public events about stress. Okay. That makes sense. But as I looked at internet articles on stress, most of them stress (pun) things one can do about stress. Look and...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Habits Happiness Health-related Self-Help Stress National Stress Awareness Month Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: The results suggest that CPAP and BIPAP are, respectively, the most effective therapeutic approaches to CSA in patients with the histories of HF and opioid use, but CPAP + O2 could be reliable in some conditions as well. Therefore, it may require further studies to be clarified. PMID: 30993083 [PubMed]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Adv Biomed Res Source Type: research
Humans have made many dietary mistakes over the years but two mistakes, in particular, stand out: close contact with animals, mostly ruminants, who conveyed their diseases to us and the adoption of the seeds of grasses as human food. These two practices not only changed the course of human history but also human disease. Over the last several centuries, Westerners have populated North America, South America, Pacific islands and other regions. Equipped with superior tools of warfare such as swords and muskets, contact with Westerners decimated indigenous people such as the millions of native Americans, Aztecs, and Amazonian...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains joint pain Source Type: blogs
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