New Mammogram Screening Guidelines FAQ

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is recommending that women who aren't at high risk of breast cancer start getting mammograms at age 50, a decade later than previously recommended. Experts answer questions about the new mammogram guidelines.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Xuanzi Qin, Rebekah H. Nagler, Erika Franklin Fowler, Sarah E. GollustAbstractThe American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Task Force recently recommended that women initiate routine breast cancer screening at older ages (45 and 50, respectively) than previously recommended, and both organizations emphasize the importance of weighing the harms of mammograms against the benefits in making informed decisions. However, little is known from national samples about how women perceive the harms and benefits of mammograms, and how these pe...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2019Source: Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, Volume 51Author(s): Hua Li, Shasha Zhuang, Deng-ao Li, Jumin Zhao, Yanyun MaAbstractBreast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in women, which seriously affect women's physical and mental health and even threat to life. At present, mammography is an important criterion for doctors to diagnose breast cancer. However, due to the complex structure of mammogram images, it is relatively difficult for doctors to identify breast cancer features. At present, deep learning is the most mainstream image classification algorithm. Therefore, this ...
Source: Biomedical Signal Processing and Control - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research
Authors: Franceschini G, Di Leone A, Terribile D, Sanchez MA, Masetti R Abstract Aim of this paper is to allows to analyze a topic of great relevance and media interest such as the role of prophylactic mastectomy in healthy women with BRCA mutation proposing to the surgeons some useful informations for decision-making. Less than 15% of all breast cancers are associated with germline genetic mutations. The majority of hereditary breast tumors are due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes that are responsible for only one third of hereditary cases. The risk estimates are extremely heterogeneous with a mean cumulative...
Source: Annali Italiani di Chirurgia - Category: Surgery Tags: Ann Ital Chir Source Type: research
Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT does not appear to be useful in cancer screening for AIM patients compared with conventional screening and carries potential harms associated with follow-up investigations. The risk of cancer in AIM differs by myositis-specific antibodies-defined subsets and cancer screening is likely to be indicated only in high-risk patients, particularly DM. These results, replicated in larger, multicentered studies, may carry significant consequences for optimal management of AIM and health resource utilization.
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
The Susan G. Komen breast cancer organization has released a study that found...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Almost 25% of women pay out-of-pocket costs for mammography Breast cancer takes financial toll beyond treatment Breast cancer patients face financial burdens Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely More women get breast screening after ACA bans copays
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Abstract With declining mortality rates, the number of breast cancer survivors is increasing. Ongoing care after breast cancer treatment is often provided by primary care physicians. This care includes surveillance for cancer recurrence with a history and physical examination every three to six months for the first three years after treatment, every six to 12 months for two more years, and annually thereafter. Mammography is performed annually. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast is not indicated unless patients are at high risk of recurrence, such as having a hereditary cancer syndrome. Many breast cancer su...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We have proposed a mass detection system, which achieves better detection accuracy performance than the existing state-of-art algorithm. We also propose a mass diagnosis system based on the fused features with density, which is more efficient than other feature model and classifier on the same dataset. PMID: 30856154 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of X-Ray Science and Technology - Category: Radiology Tags: J Xray Sci Technol Source Type: research
Abstract Breast density is a modifiable factor that is strongly associated with breast cancer risk. We sought to understand the influence of newer technologies of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) on breast density research and to determine whether results are comparable across studies using FFDM and previous studies using traditional film-screen mammography. We studied 24,840 screening-age (40-74 years) non-Hispanic white women who were participants in the Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health of Kaiser Permanente Northern California and underwent screening mammography with either Hologic (Hologic...
Source: Am J Epidemiol - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: Am J Epidemiol Source Type: research
Normally, when a physician notices a suspicious mass or lesion on a mammogram, he or she will request an ultrasound to explore it further. Based on those results, a biopsy may be performed to determine whether the mass is cancerous. “Unfortunately, right now, in some cases, physicians either overdiagnose or underdiagnose based on that biopsy, because with ultrasound they can only see so much,” said Lori Chmura, CEO of Dune Medical Devices. “The doctor is essentially going in blindly, trying to see what looks like the most suspicious area, and they’re t...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
AbstractBackgoundEarly-stage breast cancer is increasingly detected by screening mammography, and we aim to establish radiofrequency ablation therapy (RFA) as a minimally invasive, cost-efficient, and cosmetically acceptable local treatment. Although there were many studies on resection after RFA, none of them provided sufficient evidence to support RFA as a standard therapy for breast cancer.ResultsIn our Phase I study, localized tumors with a maximum diameter of 2  cm, preoperatively diagnosed by imaging and histopathology, were treated with RFA. A 90% complete ablation rate was confirmed histopathologically. Our ph...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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