Six-year-old boy who's suffered stroke and brain cancer desperately searches for bone marrow donor 

Ayden Palmer, six, from Prosper, Texas, is battling sickle cell disease, an inherited disorder that causes red blood cells to have a crescent shape, which blocks proper blood flow in vessels.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Matt Hancock claims technology is ‘a game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he is at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Genetics Matt Hancock NHS Science UK news Race Health Source Type: news
URMC is only the sixth institution in the country and the only one in New York and the Northeast to receive this accreditation so far.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
This study determines acute changes in start-up wheelchair propulsion biomechanics at the end of a fatiguing propulsion protocol. DESIGN: Quasi-experimental one-group pretest-postest design. SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-six wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (age: 35.5 ± 9.8 years, sex: 73% males and 73% with a paraplegia). INTERVENTIONS: Protocol of 15 min including maximum voluntary propulsion, right- and left turns, full stops, start-up propulsion, and rests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Maximum resultant force, maximum rate of rise of applied force, mean vel...
Source: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Spinal Cord Med Source Type: research
Patient awareness and use of CT colonoscopy have continued to dwindle since...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Can CTC improve staging for high-risk colon cancer? Calcium scores on CT colonography predict cardiac events Study confirms low rate of incidental findings on CTC CT colonography finds more cancer in seniors Does colonoscopy top CTC for cancer screening?
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Research ArticlesAlessandro Laviano, Luca Di Lazzaro, Angela Koverech,Proceedings of the Nutrition Society,Volume 77 Issue 04, pp 388-393Abstract
Source: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Research ArticlesA. Heetun, R. I. Cutress, E. R. Copson,Proceedings of the Nutrition Society,Volume 77 Issue 04, pp 369-381Abstract
Source: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Research ArticlesElizabeth Cespedes Feliciano, Wendy Y. Chen,Proceedings of the Nutrition Society,Volume 77 Issue 04, pp 382-387Abstract
Source: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Research ArticlesDalton L. Schiessel, Vickie E. Baracos,Proceedings of the Nutrition Society,Volume 77 Issue 04, pp 394-402Abstract
Source: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Ayden Palmer, six, from Prosper, Texas, is battling sickle cell disease, an inherited disorder that causes red blood cells to have a crescent shape, which blocks proper blood flow in vessels.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Calvin Steede, who lives in Bermuda, will never forget the day in 2011 when he saw the movie “Winnie the Pooh” with his mother and sister. The film ended, and suddenly the boy who likes to draw and play soccer couldn’t put on his backpack. His arms had stopped working. He couldn’t stand, and soon he couldn’t talk. Calvin, now 11, had suffered a minor stroke, a complication of sickle cell disease and the first step of a journey that would take him to Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center for minimally invasive surgery to protect his brain from future strokes. Sic...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & conditions Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center moyamoya sickle cell disease Source Type: news
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