E-cigs'twice as effective' than nicotine patches, gum or sprays for quitting

" E-cigarettes are almost twice as effective at helping smokers give up tobacco than other alternatives such as nicotine patches or gum, " Sky News reports. Researchers carried out a trial with 886 smokers who sought help through NHS stop smoking services. People were randomly assigned to either nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products (products such as patches or gums that can deliver a dose of nicotine) or e-cigarettes, plus one-to-one support for at least 4 weeks. After a year, 18% of e-cigarette users had stopped smoking tobacco, compared to 9.9% of NRT users.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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New England Journal of Medicine,Volume 380, Issue 20, Page 1973-1975, May 2019.
Source: New England Journal of Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 -- People who use combination nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of NRT, according to a review published online April 18 in the Cochrane Database...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Condition:   Smoking Cessation Interventions:   Behavioral: Text messaging plus nicotine replacement therapy;   Other: Standard Care at Lung Cancer Screening Sponsor:   Medical University of South Carolina Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Using combination nicotine replacement therapy, such as a patch plus a gum or lozenge, can increase the chances of successfully stopping smoking by 15% to 36%, compared to using single-form therapy.
Source: The Pharmaceutical Journal - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Condition:   Smoking Cessation Interventions:   Behavioral: Text messaging plus nicotine replacement therapy;   Other: Standard Care at Lung Cancer Screening Sponsor:   Medical University of South Carolina Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
(Wiley) New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Ahead of Print.
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of the smoke-free by-law added extra impetus to efforts to reduce smoking on CCLHD hospital grounds by providing the option to fine people who breach the by-law. Smoking in high-profile areas has declined substantially since 2011, and is minimal since the establishment of the smoke-free by-law. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31004373 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Health Promotion Journal of Australia - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Health Promot J Austr Source Type: research
ConclusionsThoracic surgeons are divided on their beliefs and practices regarding smoking cessation before lung resection. Most believe patient factors are the main barrier to quitting and have concerns about disease progression while awaiting cessation. Very few surgeons refer to a smoking cessation program and prescribe nicotine replacement therapy or medical therapy.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract Substance use disorders (SUD) are serious public health problems worldwide. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the neurobiology of drug reward and the transition to addiction, effective pharmacotherapies for SUD remain limited and a majority of drug users relapse even after a period of treatment. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several medications for opioid, nicotine, and alcohol use disorders, whereas none are approved for the treatment of cocaine or other psychostimulant use disorders. The medications approved by the FDA for the treatment of S...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
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