ReWalk Robotics shares fall on Q4, 2018 sales miss

Shares in ReWalk Robotics (NSDQ:RWLK) fell today after the rehabilitation exoskeleton maker posted fourth quarter and full year 2018 earnings that beat loss-per-share expectations but missed wide on sales consensus from Wall Street analysts. The Yokneam, Israel-based company posted losses of approximately $5 million, or 10¢ per share, on sales of approximately $1.6 million for the three months ended December 31, seeing losses shrink 18.6% while sales grew 4.2% when compared with its fourth quarter during the previous year. Losses per share were just ahead of the 14¢ consensus on Wall Street, where analysts expected too see sales of approximately $3 million, which the company missed. For the full year, ReWalk Robotics reported losses of approximately $21.7 million, or 59¢ per share, on sales of approximately $6.5 million, seeing losses shrink 11.9% while sales shrunk a larger 15.6% when compared with the previous fiscal year. Losses per share were ahead of the 67¢ consensus on Wall Street, where analysts expected to see sales of $8.5 million, which the company missed. “We believe that 2019 is poised to be a significant year for ReWalk. I am excited by the momentum we are seeing in Europe for our SCI devices and the opportunity before us as we prepare to launch our second product, the ReStore for stroke patients.  We plan to enter the stroke market with a unique lightweight product that fits into the existing reimbursement landscape, offering...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Featured MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat ReWalk Robotics Source Type: news

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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Heart Disease Source Type: news
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Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Featured Omron Omron Healthcare Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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