Powerful natural medicine in broccoli sprouts found to prevent cancer and protect the brain from stroke damage

(Natural News) A phytochemical found in broccoli was found to dramatically minimize the most damaging effects of a stroke. Researchers found that the molecule sulforaphane, which is naturally abundant in the vegetable, acts as a protective enzyme in the brain. Scientists from the King’s College London further noted the “scavenger-like” properties of sulforaphane, particularly in...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This minimally invasive approach can be used to achieve extensive resection with minimal morbidity for arguably the highest risk metastatic brain tumors. [...] Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part A: Central European Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 March 2019Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Valery L Feigin, Emma Nichols, Tahiya Alam, Marlena S Bannick, Ettore Beghi, Natacha Blake, William J Culpepper, E Ray Dorsey, Alexis Elbaz, Richard G Ellenbogen, James L Fisher, Christina Fitzmaurice, Giorgia Giussani, Linda Glennie, Spencer L James, Catherine Owens Johnson, Nicholas J Kassebaum, Giancarlo Logroscino, Benoît Marin, W Cliff Mountjoy-VenningSummaryBackgroundNeurological disorders are increasingly recognised as major causes of death and disability worldwide. The aim of this analysis from the Global Burden of Diseases...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Update In March 2019, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released new guidelines that suggest that most adults without a history of heart disease should not take low-dose daily aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. Based on the ASPREE, ARRIVE, and ASCEND trials, the ACC/AHA guidelines concluded that the risk of side effects from aspirin, particularly bleeding, outweighed the potential benefit. The new guidelines do not pertain to people with established cardiovascular disease, in whom the benefits of daily aspirin have been found to outweigh the risks. ___________...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Heart Health Prevention Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe evidence for equine ‐assisted interventions for adults and children across a range of conditions and presentations is equivocal. The current evidence base is marred by multiple methodological weaknesses and thus, therapeutic interventions that include a horse cannot be asserted as best practice at this time. Rigorous research is indicated to determine the utility of equine‐assisted interventions.
Source: Australian Journal of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: SPECIAL ISSUE Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In a study of mice and human brain tumors researchers at the University of the Michigan, Ann Arbor, searched for new treatments by exploring the reasons why some patients with gliomas live remarkably longer than others. The results suggested that certain patients' tumor cells are less aggressive and much better at repairing DNA than others but are difficult to kill with radiation. The researchers then showed that combining radiation therapy with cancer drugs designed to block DNA repair may be an effective treatment strategy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Ayden Palmer, six, from Prosper, Texas, is battling sickle cell disease, an inherited disorder that causes red blood cells to have a crescent shape, which blocks proper blood flow in vessels.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Ayden Palmer, six, from Prosper, Texas, is battling sickle cell disease, an inherited disorder that causes red blood cells to have a crescent shape, which blocks proper blood flow in vessels.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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