Leviticus Cardio, Jarvik Heart unveil wireless LVAD

Jarvik Heart and Leviticus Cardio yesterday unveiled a new collaborative wirelessly-powered left ventricular assist device and touted its recent first-in-human use. An article on the new heart and its first implantation was recently published in the Journal for Heart and Lung Transplantation, the companies said. The device, dubbed the Fully Implanted Ventricular Assist Device (FIVAD), is based on Coplanar Energy Transfer technology from Leviticus Cardio as well as a heart pump produced by Jarvik Heart, the companies said. The system includes a fully implanted Jarvik 2000 VAD system which is powered wirelessly using both internal and external components designed by Leviticus Cardio, and allows users the ability to move on their own without physical impediments for up to eight hours daily, the companies said. The system also features a back-up system to allow traditional wired power in the event of a wireless failure. The first implantation was performed at the Astana, Kazakhstan’s National Research Center for Cardiac Surgery, the companies said. The procedure was successful, and the patient has been discharged from the hospital, they added. “We were really satisfied how easy it was to position the internal components of Leviticus’ system during surgery. It exceeded our expectations during the operation. Simplicity of surgery has definitely contributed to the patients’ early recovery,” Dr. Jiri Maly of Prague’s Institute for Clinica...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Featured Jarvik Heart Leviticus Cardio Source Type: news

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END-STAGE HEART FAILURE (HF) results from a myriad of etiologies and represents a major financial and healthcare burden.1 Since 1983, nearly 150,000 pediatric and adult heart transplants have been reported to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) Registry, with medical advancements in perioperative care resulting in improved patient outcomes over time.2 This paper aims to assess outcomes within the field of heart transplantation. The authors will focus on historical context, current demographics, indications, and contraindications for transplantation.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research
Right-sided heart failure develops in lung transplantation candidates on prolonged peripheral extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support and is a major determinant of mortality. The use of central venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for bridging of right-sided heart failure to lung transplantation was evaluated.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Systolic heart failure (HF) is a progressive disease characterized by adverse remodeling from ischemia (ischemic cardiomyopathy, ICM) or a multitude of other causes termed non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). To accurately characterize the myocardial transcriptome in advanced HF using RNA-sequencing (RNAseq) and identify gene signatures that predict HF phenotypes.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 6 Source Type: research
Current data regarding early and late right heart failure (RHF) post-LVAD is confounded by small populations and variable definitions of RHF. In 2014, a new INTERMACS (IM) definition of RHF was introduced. Based on this contemporary definition, we sought to investigate the epidemiology and natural history of RHF after LVAD.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 23 Source Type: research
LImited mechanical support options exist for patients in biventricular heart failure. Post-transplant outcomes in those bridged with BiVAD HVADs and Total Artificial Heart (TAH) have not been well described. We sought to examine post heart transplant outcomes of this cohort in a national registry.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 21 Source Type: research
Leg muscle strength (LMS) could be an index of frailty in patients with heart failure. However, its prognostic value in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is not well investigated. We hypothesized that impaired LMS was independently associated with poor clinical outcome in patients with ADHF.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 130 Source Type: research
Multiorgan Dysfunction Syndrome (MOD) contributes to adverse outcomes in advanced heart failure (AdHF) patients after mechanical circulatory support (MCS) implantation and is associated with aberrant Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) activity. We hypothesize that a subset of previously reported 12 preoperative differentially expressed genes (DEGs) correlating with both, Functional Recovery Potential (FRP) (28 genes) and One Year Survival (1YS) (105 genes) [Bondar 2017], could directly predict FRP-related 1YS after MCS surgery.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 128 Source Type: research
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves quality of life and survival in patients with heart failure, but it has not been rigorously investigated in LVAD patients. Furthermore, the effects of different pacing strategies on hemodynamics in LVAD recipients is unknown.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 91 Source Type: research
We present the full study cohort of the first prospective study evaluating outcomes with right ventricular (RV) vs biventricular (BiV) pacing in LVAD patients.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 90 Source Type: research
Exercise-induced left bundle branch block (LBBB) is rarely observed in exercise testing, and usually implies a worse prognosis. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is well validated in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and LBBB. Although the indications of CRT do not include exercise-induced LBBB, the functional impairment secondary to dynamic electromechanical dyssynchrony could potentially be improved with CRT.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 71 Source Type: research
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