A Measles Outbreak Is Hitting the Pacific Northwest. Now There ’s a Surge in People Getting Vaccinated

MMR vaccine rates in two areas in the Pacific Northwest, which has been at the epicenter of a measles outbreak, are surging as people rush to protect themselves and their children from the virus. In Clark County, Washington – where about 50 people have been infected since the outbreak started – more than 6 times as many people were vaccinated for measles from January 13 to February 2 compared to the same period last year, according to a spokesperson for Washington State Department of Health. The rush to receive the MMR vaccine – which inoculates the recipient from measles, mumps and rubella – in Clark County is especially striking because the county has an unusually low vaccination rate. Only 81% of 1 to 5 year olds in the county have received a dose of MMR, according to Clark County, Washington Public Health. Falling vaccination rates in the United States and Europe have been blamed for outbreaks of measles. Although the MMR vaccine is considered to be highly safe and effective, its reputation has been eroded by fraudulent science and false news stories. The number of U.S. children who have not been vaccinated for preventable diseases quadrupled between 2001 and 2018, according to the CDC. Measles is considered to be highly contagious; the virus can linger in the air for two hours after an infected person is in the room, and people may be contagious without knowing that they are infected, according to the CDC. About 1 in 20 children with measles cont...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health onetime washington Source Type: news

Related Links:

We are in the midst of a measles outbreak here in the US, with cases being reported in New York City, New York state, and Washington state. In 2018, preliminary numbers indicate that there were 372 cases of measles — more than triple the 120 cases in all of 2017 — and already 79 cases in the first month of 2019 alone. Here are four things that everyone needs to know about measles. Measles is highly contagious This is a point that can’t be stressed enough. A full 90% of unvaccinated people exposed to the virus will catch it. And if you think that just staying away from sick people will do the trick, think ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Access to EPI vaccination for children is a key example of preventative public health interventions that have been curtailed in Northern Syria since the start of the conflict. These findings demonstrate that collapse of the formal public health system has led to an increasingly large group of children who are susceptible to infectious diseases with serious consequences, with younger children most vulnerable. We call on all health actors and the international community to work towards re-establishment of EPI activities as a priority to ensure that children who have had no access to vaccination in the last five...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Follow me at @JohnRossMD The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. So why are we still having measles attacks? An outbreak of measles is currently raging in Minnesota. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in California, and in 2014, 383 people were infected with measles in an Amish community in Ohio. How measles outbreaks happen There are several reasons why we are still at risk for measles outbreaks. Travelers may get infected overseas, and bring the measles virus back into the country with them unawares. The 2015 measles outbreak in Ohio began when two infected members of the Amish ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs
The recent rise in the U.S. of vaccine-preventable diseases has been largely blamed on those who refuse to vaccinate their children. Previous analyses have linked anti-vaxxers to certain outbreaks -- like last year's Disneyland measles outbreak -- but there was still some controversy over the connection.  Now a new review funded by the National Institutes of Health has found a correlation between vaccine refusal and the rise of measles and whooping cough (also known as pertussis), two common vaccine-preventable conditions.  Researchers at Emory University and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Healt...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Most of us weigh the risks and benefits of medical procedures prior to obtaining them. We sign an informed consent form with an understanding of the potential harm versus the perceived benefits. In the case of vaccinations, the great majority of parents obtain vaccinations for their children, influenced by the “sales pitch” and “scare tactics” used by physicians. We are assured that the vaccination is safe and will protect us and our children from the various targeted deadly diseases. If we blindly trust our doctors, as I once had, we readily agree. It is important that we think critically before ag...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autism Centers for Disease Control (CDC) MMR vaccine vaccine injury Source Type: blogs
Grandparents have an important role in improving the public health of America. They cannot sit idly by, biting their tongues and not saying a word. They must talk with their children who have refused to vaccinate their grandchildren. Their children tend to converse with like-minded anti-vaccination parents and must be exposed to another perspective. Grandparents don't want to be overbearing; on the other hand, they want to protect their grandchildren. It's a difficult path -- one that many pediatricians grapple with. How does one retain the trust and ability to help parents when parents may not want advice, especially when...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Cases of measles linked to an exposure at Disneyland continue to spread, not just in California, but in several other states and in Mexico. The numbers of cases are climbing — and so are the number of exposed people who might get sick — and expose more people before they realize they are sick. Measles is extremely contagious; if someone has it, they will infect 90 percent of the people around them who aren’t immunized. It’s scary, because measles can be dangerous. 1 in 20 people who get it will get pneumonia. 1 in 1,000 will get encephalitis, a brain inflammation that can lead to seizures and brain ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Claire McCarthy, MD Vaccines Source Type: news
Along with vaccines for polio and mumps, the measles vaccine was a triumph of investigative research and public health when it debuted in 1968. It quickly became part of the lineup of childhood injections that would inoculate the child and protect society from the scourge of the sometimes fatal and always painful disease and led to the elimination of measles in the U.S. in 2000 and the Americas (North, Central and South) in 2002. But a series of stumbling blocks -- notably, a fraudulent and discredited 1998 study linking vaccinations to the onset of autism -- set vaccination rates back in certain communities in the U.S. T...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Fifteen years ago, measles was considered eliminated from the United States. However, in recent weeks the number of people infected with measles has gone up to 78 since an outbreak in California’s Disneyland.  In 2014 alone there were 644 reported cases in the United States. Many of those infected were never vaccinated for various reasons.  One of the primary reasons is parent’s fear or concerns regarding the measles vaccine.  Many people may not realize the devastating effects measles can have and therefore do not fear the disease but tend to fear the vaccine due to hearing about possible side e...
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Health Literacy/Consumer Health Public Health Source Type: news
More News: Brain | Children | Conferences | Contracts | Department of Health | Encephalitis | Health | International Medicine & Public Health | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Mumps | Mumps Vaccine | Neurology | Outbreaks | Pneomococcal Vaccine | Pneumonia | Rubella | Rubella Vaccine | Science | USA Health | Vaccines