Managing pain after surgery

Surgery and pain pills used to go hand in hand. After all, you need a strong prescription pain medication to ensure you aren’t in pain after a procedure, right? Turns out not only is prescription pain medication not always needed, but often not advisable after surgery, because it can raise the risk of opioid addiction. As a result, surgeons today are rethinking post-surgical pain management strategies. And if you’re going under the knife, you should too. In the 1990s, the number of opioid prescriptions written for people undergoing surgery or experiencing pain conditions grew — and so did related problems. As a result, “We are in a current opioid epidemic, with 91 substance-related deaths each day, according to the CDC,” says Dr. Elizabeth Matzkin, an orthopedic surgeon and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. This is not just a young person’s problem. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that the proportion of older adults who misuse opioids is set to double between 2004 and 2020, from 1.2% to 2.4%. In 2016, more than 500,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries were given an opioid prescription by their doctor — and the average dose was well above recommended amounts. Rethinking pain management “Orthopedic surgeons are the third highest prescriber of opioid analgesics in the United States, and we are therefore in a pivotal position to change the current overprescribing patterns for postope...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

While Suboxone can be a helpful tool for many, it is important to also understand its addictive nature. Because it is an opioid, wondering if you can form an addiction to Suboxone can be answered simply: Yes. Although the rates of addiction are much smaller than those of other opioids, it is still important to take their addictive properties seriously and get help if you start to notice the signs and symptoms of addiction to Suboxone. What is Suboxone? According to their own website, Suboxone is a prescription medicine that contains the active ingredients buprenorphine and naloxone. It is used to treat adults who are depe...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Substance Abuse addiction treatment addictionologist detox drug detox medical detox medicated-assisted detox prescription drug detox prescription medication suboxone Source Type: blogs
Zach (left) and Bob (right) According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 70,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids, a two-fold increase in a decade. Opioids include prescription opioids and methadone, heroin, and other synthetic narcotics like fentanyl. Bob Paff has directly suffered the casualties of this epidemic. On January 21 of this year he lost his son Zach to an accidental overdose of fentanyl. A highly sought-after communications expert, business leader, and internationally recognized author, Bob now uses his communications platform to bring ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Recovery Stigma Opioid Epidemic Opioids Suicide synthetic fentanyl Source Type: blogs
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs
With all the news media accounts and reports from governmental health organizations about the opioid epidemic, including the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in 2017, a newly emerging threat is gaining attention: use and misuse of benzodiazepines, opioid drugs and Z-drugs. Specifically, combining these three drugs can create a deadly combination that snuffs out lives. Benzodiazepine Overdose Deaths on the Rise Benzodiazepines, a class of sedative narcotic drugs including Xanax and Valium used to treat anxiety, insomnia and other disorders and classified as Schedule IV under the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Enforcement ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Suicide Source Type: news
What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs
“It is borderline genocide,” said DeLuca, 37. “You are allowing [chronic pain patients] to go home and essentially suffer until they kill themselves.” Last year, Lauren DeLuca went to the emergency room in the middle of the night, violently ill and in pain with a pancreatic attack. Despite the fact that she was passing out and vomiting profusely, DeLuca said that she received little help. “I was essentially turned away,” she told The Fix. “Everywhere [I went] I was being accused of lying, accused of making it up.” Over the next three weeks, DeLuca lost 20 pounds, unable to ea...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders Health-related Medications Publishers Substance Abuse The Fix Chronic Pain opioid addiction Opioids Source Type: blogs
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping thi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
‚ÄčThe atomizer is a handy tool to instill life-saving medication into the nose, and you should consider stocking them if you don't already. An atomizer can be used to administer naloxone and countless other drugs as well as for moderate sedation and pain control. Pediatric and adult patients alike can benefit from intranasal fentanyl or Versed. Studies on intranasal epinephrine for anaphylaxis also look promising, but it does require a higher dose—5 mg instead of 0.3 mg. (Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol 2016;34[1]:38; http://bit.ly/2Prpjhb.)The atomizer is easy to use and can be attached to any syringe. Each spray creat...
Source: The Procedural Pause - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Barriers to access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) threaten addiction recovery and complicate the safety of clinicians’ jobs, thereby hindering the national response to the opioid epidemic. MAT is a treatment approach that combines medications with counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. Medications used in MAT are FDA-approved and clinically-driven; however, several MAT access issues create obstacles to achieving its full success in mitigating the opioid epidemic. Insurance access and coverage, geography/location, treatment cost, and drug policy emerge as the most formidable pai...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Recovery Research Substance Abuse Treatment medication-assisted treatment opioid addiction opioid crisis Prescription Drug Addiction Source Type: blogs
“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news
More News: Acetaminophen | Addiction | Anesthesia | Anesthesiology | Arthroscopy | Blogging | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Gastroschisis Repair | Harvard | Ibuprofen | Lortab | Medicare | Men | Orthopaedics | Pain | Pain Management | Sports Medicine | Study | Substance Abuse | Substance Abuse Disorders | USA Health