Polymorphism evidence in Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) lutzi Lucena, 1939 (Apicomplexa, Haemosporida) isolated from brazilian wild birds

Publication date: Available online 3 February 2019Source: Parasitology InternationalAuthor(s): Luísa de Oliveira, Franciane Cedrola, Marcus Vinicius Xavier Senra, Kézia Katiani Gorza Scopel, Isabel Martinele, Raquel Tostes, Roberto Júnio Pedroso Dias, Marta D'AgostoAbstractPlasmodium parasites can infect great variety of bird species around the world inflicting the so called avian malaria, an illness that could be fatal in some cases and consequently, should be monitored and widely included into conservation programs. The aim of this study was to characterize two lineages of Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) lutzi found in some birds in the Atlantic Forest of Minas Gerais - Brazil, that were morphologically identified after blood smears analyses under light microscopy and molecularly by sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (cyt b). Besides these two lineages could be clearly morphologically identified as P.(H.) lutzi, some variations in comparison with its original description were noticed: absence of meronts and gametocytes (early and fully grown) in polychromatic erythrocytes, the larger size of pigment granules in meronts and gametocytes, and the presence of small vacuoles between pigment accumulation in fully grow macrogametocytes. Moreover, a certain degree of genetic intraspecific diversity was also observed across the lineages of P. (H.) lutzi, indicating the existence of polymorphisms within this taxon, which is uncommon in Haemosporida. These...
Source: Parasitology International - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research

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scalante AA Abstract Haemosporida are diverse vector-borne parasites associated with terrestrial vertebrates. Driven by the interest in species causing malaria (genus Plasmodium), the diversity of avian and mammalian haemosporidian species has been extensively studied, relying mostly on mitochondrial genes, particularly cytochrome b. However, parasites from reptiles have been neglected in biodiversity surveys. Reptilian haemosporidian parasites include Haemocystidium, a genus that shares morphological features with Plasmodium and Haemoproteus. Here, the first complete Haemocystidium mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genom...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Haemosporidians (Apicomplexa, Protista) are obligate heteroxenous parasites of vertebrates and blood-sucking dipteran insects. Avian haemosporidians comprise more than 250 species traditionally classified into...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Martín J, Figuerola J Abstract Parasites can manipulate their hosts to increase their transmission success. Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) are thought to alter the cues such as host odour, used by host-seeking mosquitoes. Bird odour is affected by secretions from the uropygial gland and may play a role in modulating vector-host interactions. We tested the hypothesis that mosquitoes are more attracted to the uropygial secretions and/or whole-body odour (headspace) of Plasmodium-infected house sparrows (Passer domesticus) than to those of uninfected birds. We tested the attraction of nulliparous (e.g. ...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Int J Parasitol Source Type: research
This study shows that the magnitude of the host transcriptional response can differ markedly from related parasites with different virulence, and it enables a better understanding of the molecular interactions taking place between hosts and parasites. PMID: 32469658 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Naturalist - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Am Nat Source Type: research
Abstract Infectious diseases often vary seasonally in a predictable manner, and seasonality may be responsible for geographical differences in prevalence. In temperate regions, vector-borne parasites such as malaria are expected to evolve lower virulence and a time-varying strategy to invest more in transmission when vectors are available. A previous model of seasonal variation of avian malaria described a double peak in prevalence of Plasmodium parasites in multiple hosts resulting from spring relapses and transmission to susceptible individuals in summer. However, this model was rejected by a study describing di...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Int J Parasitol Source Type: research
The American Naturalist, Ahead of Print.
Source: The American Naturalist - Category: Zoology Authors: Source Type: research
This article aimed to provide a comprehensive list of the common avian Plasmodium parasites in the birds and mosquitoes, to specify the common Plasmodium species and lineages in the selected regions of West of Asia, East of Europe, and North of Africa/Middle East, and to determine the contribution of generalist and host-specific Plasmodium species and lineages. The final list of published infected birds includes 146 species, among which Passer domesticus was the most prevalent in the studied areas. The species of Acrocephalus arundinaceus and Sylvia atricapilla were reported as common infected hosts in the examined regions...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Abstract Haemosporidian parasites of the genera Plasmodium, Leucocytozoon, and Haemoproteus are one of the most prevalent and widely studied groups of parasites infecting birds. Plasmodium is the most well-known haemosporidian as the avian parasite Plasmodium relictum was the original transmission model for human malaria and was also responsible for catastrophic effects on native avifauna when introduced to Hawaii. The past two decades has seen a dramatic increase in research on avian haemosporidian parasites as a model system to understand evolutionary and ecological parasite-host relationships. Despite haemospor...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
Avian malaria parasites are a highly diverse group that commonly infect birds and have deleterious effects on their hosts. Some parasite lineages are geographically widespread and infect many host species in m...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
We examined avian Haemosporidia cytochrome b gene among terrestrial birds on Gorgona Island National Park, Colombia. Three Haemoproteus haplotype groups found on Gorgona Island have a higher genetic similarity to Haemoproteus found in the eastern tropical Pacific than those documented in Africa, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Two of the haplotype groups on the island are generalists in terms of infecting multiple hosts and their wide geographical distribution within the eastern tropical Pacific region, a third Haemoproteus haplogroup appears endemic to Gorgona Island. The overall prevalence of haemosporidian parasites is 57,9% ...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
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