Cough in pulmonary tuberculosis: Existing knowledge and general insights

Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Richard Douglas TurnerAbstractCough is a prominent symptom of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), one of the oldest and most prevalent infectious diseases. Coughing probably has a pivotal role in transmission of the causative organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite this, little research to date has addressed this subject. Current knowledge of the mechanisms of cough in TB and how exactly coughing patterns predict infectiousness is scant, but this is changing. This overview summarises the existing evidence for the infectiousness of cough in TB, clinical correlates, and possible causes of cough in TB. Potential unique characteristics of cough in the disease are discussed, as is treatment and the subjective awareness of coughing in the disease.
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

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Conclusion: OB is one of the major causes of CAO. HRCT of the chest with expiratory scans plays a important role in the diagnosis. Early diagnosis can prevent irrevocable complications.
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
We reported a case of 10-year-old boy with ulcers in the cervical and axillary region. The lesion began as papules, which gradually developed into nodules and pustules. Chronic cough was also found, however chest x ray was normal and sputum direct smear for acid fast bacil was negative. Histopathologic finding of tissue biopsy revealed epidermal necrosis in the central part surrounded by granulomatous tissue forming an abscess and histiocyte infiltrates, confirming the diagnosis of scrofuloderma. CT Scan of neck showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes, and FNAB result was suggestive for tuberculous lymphadenitis. Patient was ...
Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Respiratory Medicine Case ReportsAuthor(s): A. Haralsingh, R. RawlinsAbstractTuberculosis (TB) is a significant public health problem in many developing countries. In many cases, tuberculosis may present a significant diagnostic challenge. A 32-year-old male Chinese immigrant presented to our institution with a fever and non-productive cough. He was found to have a right pleural effusion, for which a chest drain was inserted. His tuberculin skin test was unreactive (0mm) although he was not immunocompromised (HIV negative). All cultures were negative, and 3 sputum sam...
Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
We present a rare case of multiple tuberculous mycotic aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms caused by tuberculosis (TB) are difficult to treat. Here, we discuss a treatment modality using a microcore stent graft. Patient concerns: A 73-year-old man with pain in the back and on the right side of the chest associated with dry cough, presented with an inability to walk since 1-month. Diagnoses: A diagnosis of multiple aneurysms caused by TB was made, based on computed tomography (CT) scan and positive T-spot and Xpert tests. Interventions: We administered the empirical anti-TB regimen (pyrazinamide, isoniazid, rifampicin, an...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Rationale: Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is an uncommon type of acute lung injury associated with infection, connective tissue disorders, drug exposure, and hematologic malignancies. Patient concerns: A 53-year-old female presented with intermittent fever, chills, and dry cough since 10 days. Chest computed tomography scan showed multiple bilateral patchy infiltrates. PPD skin test was positive but tuberculosis antibody test and T-SPOT were negative. Diagnoses: Histologic examination revealed massive fibrinous exudation with organization within alveolar spaces and scattered neutrophilic infiltrate...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract Our patient is a 67-year-old male with a past medical history significant for hypertension and hyperlipidemia came to a hospital with hemoptysis. He was also having cough and shortness of breath for the last 1 month. He said that his hemoptysis was about 1 cup per day mixed with yellowish sputum. He noticed around 20 pounds of weight loss in the last 1 month. He also complained of night sweats but had no fever. He had no history of travel outside the USA. He has never been incarcerated before, but he endorsed that his son has been to Jail before and he visited him twice a year in patient's home. But he al...
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respir Med Case Rep Source Type: research
ConclusionsCutaneous tuberculosis should be considered in a child presenting with a skin lesion or discharge. Cutaneous tuberculosis cases should be investigated for coexisting pulmonary and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis. Histopathologic diagnosis should be considered to rule out other skin pathologies and also to prevent delay in treatment. Better tuberculosis prevention strategies, including vaccination scale-up, are warranted.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 December 2018Source: Respiratory Medicine Case ReportsAuthor(s): Yonas Raru, Mahmoud Abouzid, Fuad Zeid, Samson TekaAbstractOur patient is a 67-year-old male with a past medical history significant for hypertension and hyperlipidemia came to a hospital with hemoptysis. He was also having cough and shortness of breath for the last 1 month. He said that his hemoptysis was about 1 cup per day mixed with yellowish sputum. He noticed around 20 pounds of weight loss in the last 1 month. He also complained of night sweats but had no fever. He had no history of travel outside the USA. He has ne...
Source: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of non-CF bronchiectasis is often delayed because of a failure to recognize the significance of symptoms. Through clinical investigation, including a HRCT scan of the chest, sweat test, studies of immune function, and ciliary function in a child with a prolonged suppurative cough, remains important. In Turkey, the most common causes of non-CF bronchiectasis are PCD and immunodeficiency, related to a high frequency of consanguinity. PMID: 29605210 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respir Med Source Type: research
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