Preoperative Measurement of ACL Insertion Sites

This study was designed to evaluate preoperative predictions of the femoral and tibial ACL insertion lengths. Intraoperative measurements were made of the femoral and tibial ACL insertion lengths with an arthroscopic ruler. A musculoskeletal radiologist and a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon measured the ACL insertions from preoperative magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) in a blinded fashion. Correlations between height, weight, body mass index, and gender with intraoperative ACL insertion length measures were also evaluated. Patient height and male gender demonstrated strong correlations with intraoperative ACL insertion measures. A moderate correlation was seen between patient weight and intraoperative ACL insertion measures. When evaluating the frequency with which the raters' respective MRI measures were exactly the same as the intraoperative measures, moderate correlations were seen. The radiologist and orthopedic surgeons' MRI measures were within 3 mm of the intraoperative measures 98 and 75% of the time, respectively, for the femur and 92 and 83% of the time, respectively, for the tibia. This study concludes that preoperative MRI measures of ACL insertion lengths can be used to predict intraoperative ACL insertion lengths. Also, it is expected that taller patients and male patients should have greater ACL insertion lengths seen arthroscopically.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of cont...
Source: Journal of Knee Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

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Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe present meta-analysis shows that patients older than 40  years achieve comparable clinical outcomes to those of younger patients following primary ACL reconstruction. This evidence may push the surgeons toward a more aggressive approach in this specific cohort of patients.Level of evidenceIII.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionOrthopaedic healthcare services in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland are suffering a drastic cutback due to COVID-19. A drastic reduction in arthroscopic procedures like rotator cuff repair and cruciate ligament reconstruction and an almost total shutdown of elective total joint arthroplasty were reported. Long-term consequences cannot be predicted yet. The described disruption in orthopaedic healthcare services has to be viewed as historic.Level of evidenceV.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis comparative study shows that flexible reamers can reproduce a desired femoral tunnel position with only small improvements of no clinical relevance. As this can be achieved without hyperflexing the knee, these systems can be used for  all patients (even when hyperflexion is a challenge).Level of evidenceI.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
ConclusionThe structure of the orthopaedic hubs, and the internal protocols proposed, could help to improve the quality of assistance for patients with musculoskeletal disorders and reduce the risk of overload in general hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
This study aimed to analyse the evolvement of joint laxity and graft compliance of short hamstring tendon grafts after ACL reconstruction (ACLR).MethodsForty-seven patients that underwent ACLR were retrospectively enrolled. Joint laxity was quantified with a GNRB® arthrometer before surgery, then at 15  days, at 1/3/6/9 months (M1–M9), at 1 year postoperatively and then again at the last mean follow-up (FU) of 14.7 ± 3.0 months. The side-to-side laxity difference (ΔL in mm) was measured at 30 and 60  N at every FU, additionally at 90 N from M3 on and at 134...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Authors: Maldonado DR, Rosinsky PJ, Shapira J, Domb BG Abstract Hip arthroscopy is rapidly growing as a treatment with good outcomes for pathologic conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement syndrome and labral tears. At the same time, it is one of the most technically challenging and demanding procedures in orthopaedics with a technically demanding skill. The first challenge is to safely access the joint, which requires accurate anatomical knowledge, a strong sense of spatial orientation, and repeated practice. Iatrogenic chondrolabral injury has been reported as the most common complication in hip arthroscop...
Source: The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: J Am Acad Orthop Surg Source Type: research
We appreciate the interest and comments from Manara et al. regarding our published technical note “Hamstring Braid Graft Technique for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction”.1 In our published article we described a step-by-step technical note presenting a novel “in vivo” hamstring braid graft configuration for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction that could potentially ov ercome some of the known disadvantages of hamstring autograft.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We took interest in reading the article “Hamstring Braid Graft Technique for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction” (1) published in Arthroscopy Techniques in Aug 2019 and would like to make a number of observations. We agree that when choosing the type and preparation technique of ACL reconstruction grafts, there are desirable ef fects in ensuring a sufficient graft diameter to maximize strength, and novel solutions to the current limitations in hamstring autografts are welcomed. The authors describe a technique to do this by braiding the graft strands, which they hypothesize would lead to a stronger graft...
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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