A Third of Americans Are Sleep-Deprived. This Technology Could Help Them Rest Easier

Despite the fact that we spend roughly a third of our lives snoozing (or at least trying to), sleep is not well understood by scientists — to say nothing of the estimated 35% of Americans who don’t get enough of it. Part of the problem is how difficult it is to study slumber. Experiments currently require individuals to come into a hospital or laboratory, cover themselves with an army of electrodes and allow a team of doctors to observe their attempts to drift off. “It’s kind of a nightmare,” says Dr. Emmanuel Mignot, director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine. “They’re hooked up to all these things and they can barely move.” This environment can make it challenging to capture data about normal sleep and is often prohibitively expensive to maintain for longer than a night or two — a necessity for researchers looking to understand trends over time. “When you are a patient, when you have problems, the last thing you want to do is add to those problems by having to wear sensors, or take measurements or write diaries about how you feel,” says Dina Katabi, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. “If we can monitor health continuously but passively in a patient’s natural environment, that can help dramatically.” Experts say artificial intelligence (AI) might help researchers do just that. “It has the potential of changing sleep medicine entirely...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence healthytime Life Reinvented Source Type: news

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Authors: Ramos AR, Tarraf W, Wu B, Redline S, Cai J, Daviglus ML, Gallo L, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Perreira KM, Zee P, Zeng D, Gonzalez HM Abstract INTRODUCTION: To determine if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration predict seven-year neurocognitive decline in US Hispanics/Latinos (N = 5247). METHODS: The exposures were baseline SDB, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration. The outcomes were change in episodic learning and memory (B-SEVLT-Sum and SEVLT-Recall), language (word fluency [WF]), processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution), and a cognitive ...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
ConclusionsCompared to previous studies, we demonstrate here a higher frequency of PD patients that carry two mutations. The GBA-E326K is more likely to affect PD risk when accompanied by another mutation, and an additive effect on risk and earlier AAO was proposed for carriers of LRRK2/mild-GBA double mutations. Altogether, these data support an oligogenic approach to PD genetics.
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
This study intended to compare the benefits of 2 mind-body interventions-yoga and mindfulness-in a hospital setting. Design: The research team performed a retrospective analysis of outcome data obtained from a hospital's programs. Setting: The study took place at a mind-body center at a hospital in Athens, GA (USA). Participants: Participants were 46 individuals enrolled either in a yoga (n = 24) or a mindfulness (n = 22) intervention program at the hospital. Intervention: Participants self-selected a mind-body-intervention program offered at the hospital: yoga or mindfulness. They received guided training ...
Source: Advances in Mind Body Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Adv Mind Body Med Source Type: research
In many ways, the stresses of being a medical student are the same as those of a doctor. But there is one major difference: money. I agree wholeheartedly with the … Language: en...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
This study aims to validate this observation. Blood levels of seven cytokines were measured in 120 patients with pSS from the United Kingdom Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome Registry and 30 age-matched healthy non-fatigued controls. Patient-reported scores for fatigue were classified acco rding to severity and compared to cytokine levels using analysis of variance. The differences between cytokines in cases and controls were evaluated using Wilcoxon test. A logistic regression model was used to determine the most important identifiers of fatigue. Five cytokines, interferon-γ-induced protein-10 (IP-10), tumour ne...
Source: Rheumatology International - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 October 2019Source: The Arts in PsychotherapyAuthor(s): Sonja Aalbers, Annemieke Vink, Ruth E. Freeman, Kim Pattiselanno, Marinus Spreen, Susan van HoorenAbstractDepression is a highly prevalent and seriously impairing disorder. Evidence suggests that music therapy can decrease depression, though the music therapy that is offered is often not clearly described in studies. The purpose of this study was to develop an improvisational music therapy intervention based on insights from theory, evidence and clinical practice for young adults with depressive symptoms. The Intervention Mapping ...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
The brain's pleasure centre begs for more food when you repeat this habit. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Sleep Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Might depression be a modifiable risk factor for NAFLD?Alimentary Pharmacology &Therapeutics
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news
By KIP SULLIVAN, JD The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) and other proponents of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) justified their support for the HRRP with the claim that research had already demonstrated how hospitals could reduce readmissions for all Medicare fee-for-service patients, not just for groups of carefully selected patients. In this three-part series, I am reviewing the evidence for that claim. We saw in Part I and Part II that the research MedPAC cited in its 2007 report to Congress (the report Congress relied on in authorizing the HRRP) contained no studies supporting tha...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medicare health reform Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program HRRP Kip Sullivan MedPAC Source Type: blogs
Did the movie Joker portray mental illness correctly and does it matter? We passionately go over the movie Joker from the lense of people living with mental illness and discuss whether or not there are implications of making a movie like this. Does it help us or hurt us? What if it does both? Listen in to hear Gabe’s freakishly good recollection of scenes from the movie as Jackie struggles to separate entertainment from reality.  Spoiler Alert: You don’t need to see Joker to appreciate this conversation but we do go over the plot and reveal some important scenes from the movie. (Transcript Available Below)...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Antidepressant Antipsychotic Depression Minding the Media Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
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