Communication in cancer: its impact on the experience of cancer care: communicating with the angry patient and the patient in denial

Purpose of review This review aims to describe the recent literature on communication between cancer care clinicians and angry patients and patients in denial. Recent findings Clinicians had improved perceived self-efficacy in responding to patient anger after completing anger management training, with a focus on reframing anger as a normative response to unmet needs. Psychosocial and mindfulness programmes for cancer patients were found to be useful for modifying anger response to stressors. Existing clinician communication guidelines may not meet the complex needs of adolescents and individuals with anger-prone personality expressing anger. The detrimental effects of avoiding communication about cancer and dying in patients and families include increased stress and emotional burden, patient depression and anxiety and regret in bereaved family members. Further understanding of the complex interplay between the expression of instrumental and emotional concerns of patients may lead to improved clinician communication. Summary Anger and maladaptive denial in patients with cancer have detrimental effects that can be seen across a wide range of cultural contexts, in not only the patient but also in their families and the involved clinicians. Training interventions for both patients and clinicians can benefit patient emotional response and perceived clinician self-efficacy.
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

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Authors: Lundberg T, Forinder U, Olsson M, Fürst CJ, Årestedt K, Alvariza A Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in psychosocial well-being over time among young adults who participated in a support group after the death of a parent from cancer. Fifty-five young adults, aged 16-28 years, completed questionnaires that measured self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction at three time-points during the first year-and-one-half after the loss. Results indicated overall poor psychosocial well-being with few increases in psychological health over the study period,...
Source: Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Tags: J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care Source Type: research
  At the thought of losing a job or missing a mortgage payment, Gabe is an anxious discombobulated mess, while Lisa is cool as a cucumber. In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa ponder: Why do people have such vastly different ways of reacting to the world? They also discuss — with the special flare that only a divorced couple has — the good old days when Gabe would have full-blown panic attacks and Lisa had to get them through it. How did they handle these scary moments? Is it ever OK to feel anger toward the panicky person? And what if the panicky person accidentally causes harm — sh...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to analyze the available evidence and to describe the benefits of the new technologies in the treatment of pain, anxiety, and depression in children and adolescents with cancer. A systematic search using six electronic databases was conducted to identify studies using technological interventions with a focus on pain, anxiety, and depression that were published from 2008 to 2018 including oncology patients from 0–18 years old. Out of the 1261 studies that were identified, five studies met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Robots were used in two studies, providing amusement and so...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionThis study provides preliminary evidence that IU ’s detrimental influence on depression and SWB may operate through its influence on insomnia symptoms. Given implications for parents’ well-being and, likely, their subsequent capacity to care for the AYA with cancer, interventions addressing IU and disturbed sleep among this underserved populat ion deserve attention.
Source: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
  Are people with mental illness more creative? Jackie believes there may be a link between the two, while Gabe thinks it’s just a bunch of hoopla. Get ready — they’ve both done their research and are ready to back their claims. Tune in to hear a lively (and friendly) debate on whether the science is valid, the difference between inspiration and creativity, as well as their own opinions and experiences on mental illness and creativity. What’s your take? Join us on this Not Crazy podcast to see whose side you’re on, or if you’re somewhere in the middle. (Transcript Available Belo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Creativity Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
Often we don’t really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication. A lot of medications are only tested on men because of the risk of pregnancy, etc. This means there are whole drugs that have made it to market that may not have ever been tested with women. Schizophrenia affects women in many different ways than men. In this episode schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers and cohost Gabe Howard discuss differences in age, symptoms, treatments, lifestyle, parenthood in the genders as they experience schizophrenia. Dr. Hayden Finch joins to explain the medical side.  Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Women...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Women's Issues Gender Differences Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Women's Health women's mental health Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Science shows moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise is good for us — it improves sleep; lowers blood pressure; protects against heart disease, diabetes and cancer; reduces stress; boosts mood; and fights anxiety and depression. It’s especially important in adolescence, where the first signs of depression often begin, studies show. But unless your child is an athlete, it can be tough to wean them away from social media and the ever-present screen to swim laps or go for a blood-pumping jog. A new study has some good news: even light exercise may help protect children against developing depression. T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Depression Source Type: news
This study aimed to investigate the risk of self-harm following diagnosis of different psychiatric disorders in an Asian population, through a review of inpatient records retrieved from the Hong Kong Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System (CDARS).MethodsFor this nested case-control study, the inpatient data of people admitted for any reason to Hong Kong public hospitals, between Jan 1, 2000, and Dec 31, 2010, were extracted from CDARS. Cases were people aged 10 years or older who had been admitted to inpatient care with a first-listed record of psychiatric disorder during the study period. The seven psychiatric disord...
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: For young adult men with testicular cancer, finding benefit appears to promote well-being in the face of masculine cancer threat. PMID: 31928079 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety Stress Coping Source Type: research
Whether you agree or disagree with her message, Greta Thunberg has suffered from the typical stigmatizing comments from those who disagree with her because of her Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis. This is the kind of ignorance most people have left behind in the last century. But some critics, instead of focusing and replying to her message about the threats of climate change, chose to focus on the messenger, Thunberg herself. Calling her “mentally ill,” one critic even went so far as to suggest she was some sort of parentally-controlled pawn in a vast global conspiracy. It shows a stunning amount of discrim...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Stigma Climate Change Greta Thunberg Mental Health Stigma Source Type: blogs
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