Next-Generation Approaches for the Treatment of Food Allergy

AbstractPurpose of ReviewIgE-mediated food allergies are an increasing health concern, and current management includes food avoidance and use of emergency medications. Effective treatment of food allergy is highly desirable. Next generation approaches for the treatment of food allergy aim to improve both safety and efficacy, potentially including long-term tolerance.Recent FindingsOral immunotherapy (OIT) and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) will likely be integrated into clinical practice as part of food allergy management in the near future. Newer approaches, such as sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), modified proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein DNA (LAMP DNA) vaccines, and the use of immunomodulatory agents, are early in development and depending on results, could also become important treatment options.SummaryThis is a review of novel approaches to the treatment of food allergy that are currently under investigation, including the use of SLIT, modified proteins, probiotics, Chinese herbal supplements, biologic therapies, and DNA vaccines, as well as a summary of the current status of OIT and EPIT.
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Related Links:

This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article.
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized allergies health onetime syndication Source Type: news
New-onset food allergy following transplantation is a described phenomenon, with the first case being reported in 1997.1,2 While post-transplantation food allergy (PTFA) is most common following liver transplantation with a prevalence ranging from 5.6 – 38%, new-onset food allergy has also been described following bone marrow transplantation (BMT).2-4 Tacrolimus, a medication used less frequently in BMT compared to solid organ transplantation, has been identified as a potentially modifiable risk factor for PTFA.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
PMID: 31382018 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a form of desensitization proposed as a treatment for food allergy (FA). Oral immunotherapy involves feeding with increasing amounts of an allergen until a small portion is regularly tolerated. The OIT goals range from “bite safe” to induction of tolerance.1,2
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Recent publications in The Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology have documented the pain and suffering associated with cutaneous allergy.1,2 In the current issue of The Annals, Jonathan Silverberg reviews a number of comorbid health problems associated with atopic dermatitis (AD). Of greatest interest to allergists, AD predisposes to a higher risk of food allergy, eosinophilic esophagitis, and respiratory allergy.3 The systemic effects of AD are also manifested by a higher risk for infectious and cardiovascular risk.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Asthma and Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Journal of Asthma and Allergy Source Type: research
To evaluate the role of atopy (i.e. atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergies) and its consequences on developing meatal stenosis in boys.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
PMID: 31376490 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Although first descriptions of this syndrome date back as far as 1942,1 the term oral allergy syndrome (OAS) first proposed in 1987 was used to describe the symptoms to various food in aeroallergen allergic patients.2,3 In 1995 the term PFAS (pollen food allergy syndrome) was used to better characterize the pathogenesis, and avoid confusion as to possible symptoms.4 It has been used primarily as an overarching term for several described entities such as birch-pollen, mugwort-celery-spice, and ragweed-melon syndromes.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Conclusions: Children with IBD should be constantly monitored by medical professionals, not only due to the underlying disease but also due to a possible concomitant allergic disease. PMID: 31333345 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Asthma | China Health | Complementary Medicine | Emergency Medicine | Food Allergy | Herbs | Immunotherapy | Probiotics | Vaccines