Parents worried about risks, still think opioids are best for kids' pain relief

(American Society of Anesthesiologists) News of opioid abuse, overdoses and reports that 90 percent of addictions start in the teen years could make any parent worry. Yet parents remain conflicted about opioids: while more than half express concern their child may be at risk for opioid addiction, nearly two-thirds believe opioids are more effective at managing their child's pain after surgery than non-prescription medication or other alternatives, according to a survey commissioned by the American Society of Anesthesiologists.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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AbstractOpioid overdose accounted for more than 47,000 deaths in the United States in 2018. The risk of new persistent opioid use following breast cancer surgery is significant, with up to 10% of patients continuing to fill opioid prescriptions one year after surgery. Over prescription of opioids is far too common. A recent study suggested that up to 80% of patients receiving a prescription for opioids post-operatively do not need them (either do not fill the prescription or do not use the medication). In order to address this important issue, The American Society of Breast Surgeons empaneled an inter-disciplinary committe...
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We describe the historical use of opioids and the scope of the current opioid crisis, review the differences between dependence and addiction, and the private and public sectors response to pain management and highlight the issue of adolescent vulnerability. We conclude with a proposal for future directions that address both public and patient health needs.
Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA: Edited by Jorge A. Gálvez Source Type: research
Conclusions A 6-month opioid educational intervention did not reduce opioid adverse events or alter opioid use in hospitalized patients. The authors ’ findings suggest that despite opioid and multimodal analgesia awareness, limited-duration educational interventions do not substantially change the hospital use of opioid analgesics.Editor ’s PerspectiveWhat We Already Know about This TopicEducation may promote safer opioid use in hospitalsWhat This Article Tells Us That Is NewThe investigators conducted a difference-in-differences analysis before and after implementation of opioid training in 31 intervention hos...
Source: Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Background Opioids can induce significant respiratory depression when administered as analgesics for the treatment of acute, postoperative, and chronic pain. There are currently no pharmacologic means of reversing opioid-induced respiratory depression without interfering with analgesia. Further, there is a growing epidemic of opioid overdose that could benefit from therapeutic advancements. The aim of this study was to test the ability of two partial agonists of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, varenicline (used clinically for smoking cessation) and ABT 594 (tebanicline, developed as an analgesic), to red...
Source: Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
The US Department of Health and Human Services estimates that more than 2 million Americans suffer from opioid use disorder with approximately 115 deaths/day due to opioid-related overdoses. In response to these rising rates of opioid overdose and addiction, growing numbers of patients are being treated with buprenorphine. However, there is no consensus on the optimal perioperative management of patients on buprenorphine. There has been conflict between anesthesia and addiction providers on whether to stop buprenorphine before surgery to allow for use of full agonist opioids or continue buprenorphine through the perioperat...
Source: Pain Management Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerThe Drug Enforcement Administration, having virtually eliminated the diversion of prescription pain relievers into the underground market for nonmedical users, appears to be setting its sights on regulating the medical management of pain, a mission not suited for law enforcement. Acting under the authority of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act), the DEA  announced a proposal to reduce, once again, the national production quotas for fentanyl, morphine, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), oxycodone, and oxymorphone, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractGlobally, chronic pain is a major therapeutic challenge and affects more than 15% of the population. As patients with painful terminal diseases may face unbearable pain, there is a need for more potent analgesics. Although opioid-based therapeutic agents received attention to manage severe pain, their adverse drug effects and mortality rate associated with opioids overdose are the major concerns. Evidences from clinical trials showed therapeutic benefits of cannabis, especially delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinoids reduced neuropathic pain intensity in various conditions. Also, there are reports on using co...
Source: Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
You're reading Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. While there is considerable debate as to how much blame doctors should be assigned for the ongoing opioid crisis, there is little doubt they can do something to curtail it -- that instead of prescribing drugs that have been found to be highly addictive they can resort to alternate forms of pain management. Doctors’ prescription of powerful painkillers like OxyContin is frequ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: health and fitness addiction health and wellness opioids self improvement Source Type: blogs
With all the news media accounts and reports from governmental health organizations about the opioid epidemic, including the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in 2017, a newly emerging threat is gaining attention: use and misuse of benzodiazepines, opioid drugs and Z-drugs. Specifically, combining these three drugs can create a deadly combination that snuffs out lives. Benzodiazepine Overdose Deaths on the Rise Benzodiazepines, a class of sedative narcotic drugs including Xanax and Valium used to treat anxiety, insomnia and other disorders and classified as Schedule IV under the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Enforcement ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Suicide Source Type: news
On November 2 the Food and Drug Administration  announced the approval of Dsuvia, a sublingual tablet containing the powerful fentanyl analog, sufentanil. Sufentanil has been used for years in the hospital setting, primarily in intravenous form for anesthesia. It is  roughly 5 to 10 times more potent than fentanyl, and thus has a significant overdose potential. The FDA reached this decision following a 10-3 vote in favor of the drug’s approval by the Anesthetic and Analgesia Drug Products Advisory Committee (AADPAC),based on data from multicenter trials.  It was not approved for outpatie...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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