Haemoproteus minutus is highly virulent for Australasian and South American parrots

Haemoproteus and Plasmodium species are widespread avian blood parasites. Several Plasmodium species are known for their high virulence and have caused significant declines in na ïve bird populations. The impact o...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research

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Abstract At the core of recognition systems research are questions regarding how and when fitness-relevant decisions made. Studying egg-rejection behavior by hosts to reduce the costs of avian brood parasitism has become a productive model to assess cognitive algorithms underlying fitness-relevant decisions. Most of these studies focus on how cues and contexts affect hosts' behavioral responses to foreign eggs; however, the timing of when the cues are perceived for egg-rejection decisions is less understood. Here, we focused the responses of American robins Turdus migratorius to model eggs painted with a thermochr...
Source: Animal Cognition - Category: Zoology Authors: Tags: Anim Cogn Source Type: research
Plasmodium species feature only four to eight nuclear ribosomal units on different chromosomes, which are assumed to evolve independently according to a birth-and-death model, in which new variants originate by d...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 August 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Luís F.P. Gondim, Rodrigo M. Soares, Aline S. Tavares, Waléria B. Silva, Rogério F. de Jesus, Horwald A.B. Llano, Leane Q. GondimAbstractMost reported isolates of Sarcocystis spp. derived from Brazilian opossums (Didelphis sp.) have genetic characteristics distinct from the known species of Sarcocystis, but behave similarly as Sarcocystis falcatula, as they are infective to budgerigars. In previous studies, these Brazilian isolates, classified as Sarcocystis falcatula-like, ...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Plasmodium elongatum (cytochrome b lineage pGRW6) is a widespread avian malaria parasite, often causing severe disease in non-adapted hosts. This parasite lineage is of global distribution however, its virulence ...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
ák P Abstract Lymnaea stagnalis is a common freshwater gastropod. Importantly, the snail serves as the intermediate host for more than one hundred species of digenetic trematodes, including the avian schistosome Trichobilharzia szidati, a causative agent of cercarial dermatitis in humans. Infection of L. stagnalis by T. szidati initiates a dynamic confrontation between the host and the parasite that culminates in immunocompatibility ensuring survival and development of larvae. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms determining this immunocompatibility remain poorly characterised. By employing a variety of ...
Source: Developmental and Comparative Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Dev Comp Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Attenuated strains of avian Eimeria parasites, generated by the selection of precocious lines through serial passaging in chicks, have been used widely as live vaccines. Detailed morphological transitions including their life cycle depending on the passages remain poorly understood. Here, we showed early development and acceleration of transitions in morphological forms of the asexual schizonts of E. tenella that had been attenuated for virulence by serial passaging. Our results may be helpful in understanding parasitism, facilitating further molecular analyses such as comparative genomic or transcriptomi...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Abstract Brain lateralization, or the specialization of function in the left versus right brain hemispheres, has been found in a variety of lineages in contexts ranging from foraging to social and sexual behaviours, including the recognition of conspecific social partners. Here we studied whether the recognition and rejection of avian brood parasitic eggs, another context for species recognition, may also involve lateralized visual processing. We focused on American robins (Turdus migratorius), an egg-rejecter host to occasional brood parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and tested if robins prefer...
Source: Biology Letters - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Biol Lett Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 July 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Valentina Virginia Ebani, Simona Nardoni, Marinella Giani, Guido Rocchigiani, Talieh Archin, Iolanda Altomonte, Alessandro Poli, Francesca ManciantiAbstractThe aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of some avian Haemosporidia, Coxiella burnetii and Francisella tularensis in waterfowl from Tuscany wetlands. One-hundred and thirty-three samples of spleen were collected from regularly hunted wild birds belonging to 13 different waterfowl species. DNA extracted from each sample was s...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 July 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Tierra C. Groff, Teresa J. Lorenz, Rocio Crespo, Tatjana Iezhova, Gediminas Valkiūnas, Ravinder N.M. SehgalAbstractA juvenile White-headed woodpecker (Dryobates albolarvatus) fitted with a radio tag was located dead at approximately 22-days post-fledging in Yakima county in central Washington in July 2015. Postmortem examination revealed an enlarged liver and spleen plus evidence of iron sequestration. Microscopic examination observed young gametocytes within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes, and ex...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Abstract Despite extensive research on the sensory and cognitive processes of host rejection of avian brood parasites' eggs, the underlying perceptual and cognitive mechanisms are not sufficiently understood. Historically, most studies of host egg discrimination assumed that hosts rejected a parasite's egg from their nest based on the perceived color and pattern differences between the parasite's egg and their own. A recent study used a continuous range of parasitic egg colors and discovered that hosts were more likely to reject browner foreign eggs than foreign eggs that were more blue green, even when their abso...
Source: The American Naturalist - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Am Nat Source Type: research
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