Carbenoxolone Could Deteriorate Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes through Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and IFN- γ in C57BL/6 Mice.

Carbenoxolone Could Deteriorate Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes through Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and IFN-γ in C57BL/6 Mice. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2018 Dec 01;17(6):564-573 Authors: Rasouli M, Jafari-Khataylou Y, Ashrafi-Helan J Abstract Type 1 diabetes (T1D), a spontaneous autoimmune disease, is associated with destruction of insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreas. Since some heat shock proteins (HSP), such as HSP70 exert a protective effect in both tissues and cells, the present study was conducted to elucidate the effects of carbenoxolone (CBX) as an HSP70 inducer on T1D. The disease was induced in male C57BL/6 mice using streptozotocin (STZ) and subjects were allocated to therapeutic 1 and therapeutic 2 groups, as well as negative and positive control groups. The treated mice (therapeutic 1 and therapeutic 2 groups) received 50 mg/kg CBX intraperitoneally every 24 hours, in the therapeutic 1  group the drug was injected before and after disease induction whereas in the therapeutic 2 group the drug was injected only after disease induction. Serum fasting blood sugar (FBS) level, cytokines production (Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), Interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-17), serum HSP70 level and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency measurements were outperformed 14 days after the last STZ injection. Our results showed that in the treated groups, serum HSP70, IFN-γ, and IL-17 levels were increased in co...
Source: Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

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Hugo Barcenilla1*†, Linda Åkerman1†, Mikael Pihl2, Johnny Ludvigsson1,3 and Rosaura Casas1 1Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden 2Core Facility, Flow Cytometry Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden 3Crown Princess Victoria Children's Hospital, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β-cells. The time from onset of islet autoimmunity to m...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Alessandro Poggi1*, Roberto Benelli2, Roberta Venè1, Delfina Costa1, Nicoletta Ferrari1, Francesca Tosetti1 and Maria Raffaella Zocchi3 1Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 2Immunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 3Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy It is well established that natural killer (NK) cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Indeed, they can recognize molecules induced at the cell surface by stress signals ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions In conclusion, articles in this Research Topic made a very significant contribution to our understanding of the role played by environmental factors, dysbiotic conditions, and infections in triggering diseases. Since this is a rapidly expanding area of research, many other factors contributing to the onset of these diseases are not covered here. We are confident, however, that further studies will expand the list as well as bring a better understanding of mechanisms involved in the onset of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. Author Contributions All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and i...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Discussion There are numerous microbial communities inhabited in the human body, which is critical to human health. The relationship between human microbiome and diseases received much attention from both medical and bioinformatics community recently. However, traditional methods to detect their association is costly and labor-intensive. Thus, we proposed here a new computational model called NBLPIHMDA to infer potential microbe-disease associations. NBLPIHMDA first combined known microbe-disease associations in HMDAD and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity to construct disease similarity network and microb...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This study was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Manitoba Health Research Council. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. References 1. Sprent J, Kishimoto H. The thymus and central tolerance. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. (2001) 356:609–16. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2001.0846 PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar 2. Sakaguchi S, Wing K, Miyara M. Regulatory T cells - a brief history and perspective. ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the frequency of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ and CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+ (representing Tfh) cells as well as serum levels of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell autoantibodies (ICA) in children with type I diabetes. We analyzed the percentage of Tfh cells within peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 20 children with T1D (≤300 days from disease onset; Mean age 6.8±4.6 years) and 18 healthy individuals (Mean age 8.8±2.2 years) using flow cytometry. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and islet-cell cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ICA) levels were determined by ELISA and in...
Source: Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Zein is a protein in corn (“maize” outside the U.S.) that, if held side-by-side against the gliadin protein of wheat, rye, or barley, overlaps substantially in structure (i.e., amino acid sequence). In other words, the zein protein of corn resembles the gliadin protein of other grains—not identical but with overlapping similarities in structure. This should come as no surprise, as corn and other grains share evolutionary history as grasses, not to mention ongoing exchange of genetic material over eons, given the impressive promiscuity of grasses and their ability to share and combine genetic material. (Re...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates grain-free grains Inflammation wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: The emergence of new classes of T-helper effector cells and their cytokines has led to a change in our understanding of therapeutic potentials of DCs. This has provided both new options and challenges for researchers involved in this field, and is likely to result in advancement in identifying and developing novel therapeutic measures and innovative strategies for several immunological chronic disorders.
Source: Current Immunology Reviews - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the result of the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) act as mediators of peripheral tolerance. We investigated the possible alterations of such cells in peripheral blood of patients with T1D compared to normal individuals. This comparison may lead to a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis processes involved in T1D. 92 participants, including 49 patients with T1D and 43 healthy controls were studied. 3 mL of blood was taken from all participants. After isolating peripheral blood mononu...
Source: Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Before the medical community had better understanding of the mechanisms that cause disease, doctors believed certain ailments could originate from imbalances in the stomach. This was called hypochondriasis. (In Ancient Greek, hypochondrium refers to the upper part of the abdomen, the region between the breastbone and the navel.) This concept was rejected as science evolved and, for example, we could look under a microscope and see bacteria, parasites, and viruses. The meaning of the term changed, and for many years doctors used the word “hypochondriac” to describe a person who has a persistent, often inexplicab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Source Type: blogs
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