The renaissance of PACS -- and why it didn't deconstruct

Five years ago saw the birth of "deconstructed PACS" -- the idea that hospitals...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Revisiting deconstructed PACS: Part 2 Revisiting deconstructed PACS: Part 1 The time is now for deconstructed PACSComments: 1/17/2019 6:31:05 AMThePACSman                 I read this at 3:45 am and started walking out my office door to get the kids to bring them down to the fallout shelter and then realized they were grown and gone already and I didn’t have to save them.                   Few stories have caused more controversy than ones dealing with Deconstructed PACS (DP). As the day goes on I have no doubt its leading supporter will chime in as may others. I have written about it several times on AM as well since 2014 and each time I have been “corrected” on how I am wrong I am about DP about it so I just smile, listen and respect everyone’s position.                   From my perspective the whole “PACS is dead” movement was more a marketing ploy than anything else. After all, how else can you jump start an independent PACS consulting practice after being in the vendor side of the house for 11 years then by creating an industry-wide controversy? And what a controversy it caused!! Lines were drawn in the sand and, with support...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 -- Severe sleep apnea is a risk factor for diabetic eye disease that can lead to vision loss and blindness, researchers report. Poor control of diabetes can result in damage to tiny blood vessels at the back of the eye, a...
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This article emphasizes the need for more investigations to define this link further and suggests clinical and societal responses that might reduce the major impacts of this condition on populations.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
When most people think about sun-related damage, they probably worry about their skin. But the sun’s ultraviolet rays also pose a threat to a person’s eyes. According to a 2014 study funded by the U.S. National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, UV radiation can damage proteins in the eye’s lens. Over time, this damage can raise a person’s risk for cataracts, which impair vision. “When you don’t wear protection, ultraviolet radiation you cannot see is penetrating the eye, and the eye structures are very sensitive to it,” says Dr. Rebecca Taylor, a Nashville-b...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Lifestyle Source Type: news
Soft-tissue injectable fillers are a popular treatment option for patients seeking minimally invasive facial rejuvenation. The use of soft-tissue fillers has increased significantly in the past 10  years. In 2017 alone, clinicians administered nearly 2.7 million soft-tissue fillers, up from 1.3 million in 2007. Although injectable fillers have a relatively high safety profile compared with more invasive rejuvenation procedures, serious adverse events, including intra-arterial injections, nec rosis, and visual symptoms such as blindness, have been documented.
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Craniomaxillofacial deformities/sleep disorders/cosmetic surgery Source Type: research
There are more than 10,000 patent filings for brain-based devices that claim to help people “develop muscle memory faster,” “lose weight,” “monitor and act on…sleep,” and “treat depression.” Many of the websites featuring these devices cite “science” as backing up their claims. However, a recent review by science journalist Diana Kwon concluded that the large majority of these claims are not scientifically valid. As a consumer, how can you separate hype from science when deciding to use a brain-based device? Even when there is science, you can’t assum...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Health trends Medical Research Source Type: blogs
Publication date: December 2019Source: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 30Author(s): Annette E AllenLight has a profound influence on human physiology and behaviour, most notably permitting visual perception. However, light information serves a parallel set of functions in biology that are essential for our health and wellbeing, including the synchronisation of our circadian clock to the solar day. The circadian clock drives endogenous daily rhythms across human physiology and behaviour. However, when the circadian clock is not appropriately aligned with external time, disturbances in sleep/wake behaviours, a...
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We present a totally blind adolescent with refractory insomnia due to a combination of Non-24 hour sleep-wake disorder and restless leg syndrome that was successfully treated with tasimelteon, iron replacement, and gabapentin. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of treatment of N24 with tasimelteon in an adolescent. In addition, this case highlights the importance of recognizing and treating multifactorial causes of insomnia. PMID: 31249480 [PubMed - in process]
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Every day, retinal specialists are asked about the risks from blue light emitted from electronic devices. (Retinal specialists treat conditions affecting the retina, a thin tissue at the back of the eye that is responsible for vision.) Many people ask whether blue light will increase their risk of age-related macular degeneration and blindness. The short answer to this common question is no. The amount of blue light from electronic devices, including smartphones, tablets, LCD TVs, and laptop computers, is not harmful to the retina or any other part of the eye. What is blue light? Blue light is visible light between 400 and...
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