Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer's disease, say USC researchers

(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer's disease. The study, which will be published Jan. 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer's-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A study by the University of Southern California found that giving mice the medication 3K3A-APC protects their brains against the build-up of toxic proteins and inhibits memory loss.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study shows that some genetic changes linked to cancer are present in surprisingly large numbers of normal cells. We still have a long way to go to fully understand the implications of these new findings, but as cancer researchers, we can't underestimate the importance of studying healthy tissue." Early Onset of Menopause Correlates with Shorter Life Expectancy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/10/early-onset-of-menopause-correlates-with-shorter-life-expectancy/ Aging is a phenomenon affecting all organs and systems throughout the body, driven by rising levels of molecular damage. The v...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Most people are familiar with the steps they can take to lower their risk of heart disease and cancer. Choosing your diet carefully, exercising and quitting smoking have all been shown to lower the risk of these diseases. But when it comes to dementia — including dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease — scientists haven’t found many actionable steps that people can take to lower their risk. Genes play a prominent role in who develops dementia, especially Alzheimer’s, and age is also a dominant factor in the degenerative brain disorder, but neither are under human control. Now, in a presentati...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news
There are ways you can interact with someone who has dementia to minimize the use of the word “No”, and to get them to cooperate more easily.By Rita JablonskiAlzheimer's Reading RoomPeople with dementia say “NO” to nearly every question or request.This is an incredible challenge for caregivers.In this article, I explain one reason for the non-stop no ’s …and offer strategies for preventing and managing the negativity.Dementia Patients are People TooSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail:Patterns of Memory Loss and Retrieval ProblemsAll dementias share this same common feature:mo...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer Alzheimer's family care of dementia patients dementia care strategies elderly dementia care help alzheimer's help with dementia care no say no Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: In a sample of elderly individuals, we found a significant association between low plasma Klotho levels and VD, but not LOAD. This finding suggests that, although these 2 forms of dementia might overlap, some physiopathological mechanisms related to VD and LOAD remain distinct.Gerontology
Source: Gerontology - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
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