A Case with Concomitant Spontaneous Tension Pneumothorax and Acute Myocardial Infarction.

A Case with Concomitant Spontaneous Tension Pneumothorax and Acute Myocardial Infarction. Intern Med. 2019 Jan 10;: Authors: Arao K, Mase T, Nakai M, Sekiguchi H, Abe Y, Kuroudu N, Oobayashi O Abstract A 71-year-old man presented to our hospital for dyspnea lasting for the past 3 days. Chest X-ray and computed tomography demonstrated right tension pneumothorax, and an electrocardiogram suggested acute inferior myocardial infarction. Despite the relief of tension pneumothorax, the electrocardiographic findings were not completely resolved. Emergency coronary angiography demonstrated an occlusive lesion in the right coronary artery, and percutaneous coronary intervention was performed successfully. Thereafter, the chest tube was removed, and he was discharged. While rare, multiple life-threatening diseases that present with similar symptoms can coexist, so a re-evaluation after performing the initial treatment for one of these diseases is crucial. PMID: 30626814 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research

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Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThe integrated clinical safety data indicated that RM-1929 PIT treatment had a favorable safety profile with no unexpected safety concerns.Clinical trial identificationNCT02422979.Legal entity responsible for the studyRakuten Medical, Inc.FundingRakuten Medical, Inc.DisclosureJ.M. Johnson: Advisory / Consultancy: Foundation Medicine; Research grant / Funding (institution): BMS; Research grant / Funding (institution): Merck; Research grant / Funding (institution): AstraZeneca. J.M. Curry: Research grant / Funding (institution): AstraZeneca. S.T. Kochuparambil: Shareholder / Stockholder / Stock options, Full / Par...
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: REGIONAL ANESTHESIA: Edited by Nabil Elkassabany Source Type: research
PATIENTS UNDERGOING cardiac surgery are at risk for cardiovascular collapse from a variety of pathologies including, but not limited to, hemorrhage, tamponade, myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, or cardiogenic shock. Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication after cardiac surgery and requires prompt recognition and treatment. The subsequent case report describes an occurrence of tension pneumothorax and hemodynamic instability after the use of an airway exchange catheter (AEC) to extubate and reintubate a patient with a difficult airway following cardiac surgery.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Authors: Allardet-Servent J, Sicard G, Metz V, Chiche L Abstract Oxygen therapy is used to reverse hypoxemia since more than a century. Current usage is broader and includes routine oxygen administration despite normoxemia which may result in prolonged periods of hyperoxemia. While systematic oxygen therapy was expected to be of benefit in some ischemic diseases such as stroke or acute myocardial infarction, recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have challenged this hypothesis by showing the absence of clinical improvement. Although oxygen is known to be toxic at high inspired oxygen fractions, a recent meta-a...
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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