Demystifying Medicine 2019

Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/8/2019. This one-hour, 48-minute presentation discusses the history of pandemics, their challenges, and the next influenza pandemic. Topics include the role of viral, host, and secondary bacterial factors in influenza pathogenesis; contemporary Avian influenza, and why an HIV vaccine Is essential for ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Video or Multimedia)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published: 1/8/2019. This one-hour, 48-minute presentation discusses the history of pandemics, their challenges, and the next influenza pandemic. Topics include the role of viral, host, and secondary bacterial factors in influenza pathogenesis; contemporary Avian influenza, and why an HIV vaccine Is essential for ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Video or Multimedia)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
Conclusions Using a systematic evidence base and consensus development process among stakeholders within and outside VA, we report on the first national VA comprehensive emergency management program evaluation and research agenda. VA provides a unique national laboratory for the conduct of high quality research that will improve VA’s and our Nation’s emergency medical and public health preparedness and the role of health delivery systems in that endeavor. To effectively foster the conduct and expansion of emergency management evaluation and research within VA, the consensus was that VA needs to build program ev...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Source Type: research
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs
This virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine technology for influenza viruses, based on a mixture of VLPs expressing the hemagglutinin protein or the neuraminidase protein from influenza virus strains belonging to different virus subtypes, has demonstrated broad protection against lethal challenge in mice with various influenza virus strains and virus subtypes. Results from ferret and mouse studies demonstrate broad heterosubtypic protection against various influenza virus subtypes further supporting and strengthening the proposed application of this technology as a universal influenza virus vaccine.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.:&n...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
This article documents the first case of TSS associated with the use of a menstrual cup in a 37-year-old woman. The authors also discuss the history of TSS associated with tampon use and the mechanisms by which menstrual cups may also lead to the syndrome. Avian influenza A (H5N1) infection with respiratory failure and meningoencephalitis in a Canadian travellerSince 1997, more than 600 individuals worldwide have been infected with the poultry-originating influenza, H5N1. This report describes the first case of avian influenza A (H5N1) in the Western hemisphere in a 28-year-old woman who had just returned from a trip to Be...
Source: Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Influenza virus neuramindase (NA) protein is a surface protein that plays an essential role in virus replication. Drugs and antibodies that block NA function can reduce both the symptoms and the length of illness; however, variants of influenza virus are resistant to NA inhibitors. The neuramindase 1 (N1) subtype of NA is important because it is found in the two pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains (1918 Spanish flu and 2009 swine flu) and the H5N1 avian influenza virus. Anti-neuramindase antibody CD6 is a novel antibody that spans a conserved 30 amino acid epitope across the lateral face of a neuramindase (NA) dimer. The...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Intranasal delivery is a simple, inexpensive and needle-free route for administration of vaccines and therapeutics. This intranasal delivery technology, developed with Creare LLC., includes low-cost, disposable drug cartridges (DDCs) that mate with a durable hand-held device. The rechargeable-battery-powered device transmits ultrasonic energy to the DDC to aerosolize the drug and is capable of performing for eight hours at 120 vaccinations per hour. Potential applications for this platform technology include intranasal vaccination (e.g. seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines) and intranasal delivery of locally active (e.g...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
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