Heart disease and breast cancer: Can women cut risk for both?

Very often I encounter women who are far more worried about breast cancer than they are about heart disease. But women have a greater risk of dying from heart disease than from all cancers combined. This is true for women of all races and ethnicities. Yet only about 50% of women realize that they are at greater risk from heart disease than from anything else. Currently in the US, three million women are living with breast cancer, which causes one in 31 deaths. Almost 50 million women have cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart disease and strokes and causes one in three deaths. Here’s what’s really interesting, though: heart disease and breast cancer share many of the same risk factors. What’s more, there are two big risk categories that we can do something about: exercise and diet. Heart disease and breast cancer: How much exercise is needed? Many studies have shown that the less physically active a woman is, the higher her risks are for cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Of course, the flip side is that the more physically active she is, the lower her risks. How much physical activity is recommended? Well, the latest government physical activity guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association guidelines on activity both call for at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity weekly. That’s only 21 minutes daily. More is better. But by current statistics, less than 18% of women are meeting that minimum of 21 minute...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

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We present a rare case of hemichorea associated with a hemorrhagic stroke in the contralateral striatum.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
Antipsychotic medications are a vital part of controlling psychosis in schizophrenic patients. However, when those patients live in nursing facilities, we are obligated by CMS to undertake gradual dose reductions of antipsychotic medication if possible. Sometimes, these efforts are successful and sometimes they fail. Antipsychotic medications have many side effects, including sedation, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, weight gain, motor rigidity, impaired gait, and falls. Monitoring of blood glucose, lipids, and extrapyramidal symptoms is mandatory.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
Nutrition plays a vital role in the older adult, as weight in older adults is used as a marker of health and wellness. Individualization of meals is very limited; therefore, it is essential to offer a well-balanced diet options. In this regard, the national guidelines for the older adult can offer guidance to direct the meal options. There are national guidelines from the US Departments of Health and Human Services and Agriculture with dietary recommendations for community-dwelling healthy older adults.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
Nursing home (NH) residents are at increased risk for malnutrition compared to community-dwelling older adults. Poor nutrition is associated with depression, functional decline, and higher 1-year mortality. Communal dining environments create a social dining atmosphere that increases the amount of food being consumed.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
Management of diabetes in post-acute settings needs special considerations. Hypoglycemia in the skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities can lead to readmissions and complications including falls. Current EHR care-sets may not make a distinction between hospital and post-acute settings regarding diabetes management. The current diabetes management care-set in the EHR of our large healthcare system includes checking the blood sugar QID/AC/HS (before breakfast, lunch and dinner, and bedtime).
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
The geriatric population is at high risk of severe low blood glucose (LBG) events due to diminished homeostatic mechanisms, especially on hypoglycemic medications. Moderate to severe LBG events in these patients can contribute to behavior changes such as agitation, change in level of consciousness, disruption of sleep, instability and increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and falls. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment and prevention of LBG and recurrences can reduce risk for hospitalization in the geriatric population.
Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 February 2020Source: Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental MutagenesisAuthor(s): Yu Gao, Ping Wang, Yinping Su, Zhaonan Wang, Lin Han, Jie Li, Yinghua Fu, Fengling Zhao, Quanfu Sun, Yumin Lyu
Source: Mutation Research Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS.: Our results confirm orbitofrontal structural deficits in BPD, while providing a framework and preliminary findings on identifying structural correlates of symptom dimensions in BPD, especially with dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortices. PMID: 32093800 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS.: Despite sharing a lower IQ and a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, brain abnormalities in BDo appear less pronounced (but are not absent) than in SZo. Lower ICV in SZo implies that familial risk for schizophrenia has a stronger association with stunted early brain development than familial risk for bipolar disorder. PMID: 32093799 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Morris G, Maes M, Berk M, Carvalho AF, Puri BK Abstract Nutritional ketosis, induced via either the classical ketogenic diet or the use of emulsified medium-chain triglycerides, is an established treatment for pharmaceutical resistant epilepsy in children and more recently in adults. In addition, the use of oral ketogenic compounds, fractionated coconut oil, very low carbohydrate intake, or ketone monoester supplementation has been reported to be potentially helpful in mild cognitive impairment, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autistic spectrum disorder. In these and other neurode...
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
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