The federal plan for health science and technology ’s response to the opioid crisis: understanding sex and gender differences as part of the solution is overlooked

This report provides the “roadmap” for a coordinated federal research and development response to the opioid crisis. Other than noting the important concerns regarding maternal and neonatal exposure to opioids, the report overlooks the laboratory, clinical, and epidemiological data that inform the need for further resea rch on sex and gender differences in opioid addiction that have critical gender-based treatment and prevention implications. As we embark on research and development, investigations into the neurobiology of pain, opioid use, and addiction must include both females and males in model systems and, sim ilarly, psychological and sociocultural investigations must study women and men. All data should be reported by sex and gender so that gender-specific treatment and prevention strategies derived from this research are provided to practitioners and the public. We encourage biomedical researchers and clinical care providers, as well as the public, to insist that a successful response to the opioid crisis should highlight the importance of understanding sex and gender differences in the current opioid epidemic.
Source: Biology of Sex Differences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

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DiscussionThe social construction of the opioid epidemic polarizes individuals as good or bad with little attention paid to underlying institutional interests both in the creation of the problem or in the solutions that are proposed. We show that as concerns about harms from opioids become more pronounced, the narrative shifts to home in on illicit street-use with a corresponding uptake of stigmatizing references to “addicts”. Concurrently, most references to the pharmaceutical industry disappear from view. This framing of the problem defines the kinds of solutions that then seem natural. For example, increased...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Chronic pain serves as an important factor in the persistence of drug use in more than one-third of PWID in this sample. The high prevalence of chronic pain with drug use for pain suggests that proper pain management is likely to be an essential component of preventing or regressing injection drug use in PWID, with data needed on effective interventions for this population. PMID: 31704433 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2019Source: Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Jack E. Henningfield, Judy B. Ashworth, Karen K. Gerlach, Bernie Simone, Sidney H. SchnollAbstractPain and addiction are complex disorders with many commonalities. Beneficial outcomes for both disorders can be achieved through similar principles such as individualized medication selection and dosing, comprehensive multi-modal therapies, and judicious modification of treatment as indicated by the patient's status. This is implicit in the term “medication assisted treatment” (MAT) for opioid use disorders (OUD), and is equally...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract The opioid epidemic is a significant public health concern linked to chronic pain. Despite efforts to change opioid prescribing practices for chronic pain, opioid-involved overdoses remain at an all-time high. Research focused on identifying individual difference factors for problematic opioid misuse in the context of chronic pain have identified certain psychological variables that may confer heightened risk for opioid-related problems. Anxiety sensitivity, or fear of anxiety-related physical sensations, has been linked to opioid-related problems among adults with chronic pain. Yet, it is possible that t...
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of this review is to examine the impact of the opioid epidemic in adolescents and young adults and recent findings regarding the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) in pediatric medical settings.Recent FindingsExisting guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain in adults are not intended to be applied to adolescents, who arguably may need different interventions that balance the need to mitigate the long-term impact of chronic pain with the need to limit opioid misuse. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment is an important upstream strategy to prevent opioid misus...
Source: Current Addiction Reports - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
In the Scheetz household, back-to-school anxiety reached new heights this fall. Jami Scheetz’s 15-year-old son Devon, who has severe asthma, kicked a brutal vaping habit over the summer, with help from a nicotine patch. But as soon as school started and he was once again around kids vaping, his habit returned. On Sept. 12, Devon vaped at school and immediately began sweating and vomiting. Though Scheetz, who lives in Sellersville, Pa., says her son is now fine, she can’t shake thoughts of kids who have been hospitalized or died after using e-cigarettes. “Vaping scares me more [than smoking], because they ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized vaping Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 12 September 2019Source: EXPLOREAuthor(s): Arya. Nielsen, L.Susan. WielandAbstractCochrane is an international non-profit organization established in 1993 to produce and disseminate high quality and unbiased systematic reviews of evidence on health care interventions. At the forefront of systematic review methodology, Cochrane is generally accepted to be among the most carefully prepared and rigorous sources of systematic review evidence. There are numerous Cochrane reviews on nonpharmacologic interventions for pain and multiple Cochrane reviews evaluating acupuncture therapy in pain cond...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
While Suboxone can be a helpful tool for many, it is important to also understand its addictive nature. Because it is an opioid, wondering if you can form an addiction to Suboxone can be answered simply: Yes. Although the rates of addiction are much smaller than those of other opioids, it is still important to take their addictive properties seriously and get help if you start to notice the signs and symptoms of addiction to Suboxone. What is Suboxone? According to their own website, Suboxone is a prescription medicine that contains the active ingredients buprenorphine and naloxone. It is used to treat adults who are depe...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Substance Abuse addiction treatment addictionologist detox drug detox medical detox medicated-assisted detox prescription drug detox prescription medication suboxone Source Type: blogs
Jeffrey A. SingerAfter addressing the “meth epidemic” with the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 (don’t look now, but meth-related deaths are at historic highs, eclipsing those solely from prescription opioids), and after addressing the opioid epidemic by depriving patients of pain medication while  driving nonmedical users to more dangerous drugs, it appears politicians, assisted by an eager press, are setting their sights on fixing the newest “epidemic:” the “growing epidemic of e-cigarette use in our children.”Secretary of Health and Human Serv...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The opioid epidemic in the US today is well-documented in the academic literature and lay press. In response, national and local efforts have increased awareness of the opioid epidemic, which may have decreased opioid exposure, especially among adolescents and young adults. Despite these efforts, some data suggest dentists are prescribing more opioids over time1. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been specifically identified as responsible for prescribing a large proportion of opioids to an at-risk population of adolescents and young adults following third molar (M3) operations, leading to inflammatory headlines such as...
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
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