Book Review: Dancing on the Tightrope

We all face challenges in life, and more often than not, we feel they are unique to our lives and unlike other peoples’ challenges. However, according to Beth Kurland, PhD, the challenges of being human are more common than we might believe. She writes, “There are five core evolutionary challenges that we all face as human beings that can take us away from living our lives most fully.” In her new book, Dancing on the Tightrope: Transcending the Habits of Your Mind &Awakening to Your Fullest Life, Kurland shows us that it is in understanding these challenges, and the habits they are characterized by, that we can tap into our inner resources — which are the greatest tools we have to become more resilient, aware, and empowered. Some of our behaviors arise out of instinctual programs that made sense at the time, but no longer help us. Kurland writes, “While these more primitive systems of our brains have been integrated in complex ways with our more recently evolved brain systems, there are ways in which — metaphorically speaking — they haven’t been fully upgraded to meet the challenges of our modern lives.” Distraction, anxiety, fear, and self-criticism can send us spiraling downward while also shutting out the possibility of change. However, hardwired into our brains is the potential to experience growth, happiness, joy, and resilience. The first challenge is to not respond to false alarms. Kurland writes, “Our pri...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Psychology Self-Help Stress Acceptance And Commitment Therapy beth kurland Dancing on the Tightrope Source Type: news

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Treating chronic low back pain (CLBP) with spine-focused interventions is common, potentially dangerous, and often ineffective. We posit that CLBP in older adults is a geriatric syndrome – a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors. We have published evidence and expert consensus-based algorithms to guide evaluation and treatment of key biopsychosocial CLBP contributors in older adults – hip osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, fibromyalgia, sacroiliac joint syndrome, lumbar spinal stenosis, leg length inequality, lateral hip/thigh pain, anxiety, depression, insomnia, and maladaptive coping....
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Over the years, the stigma surrounding mental illness has significantly decreased. One of the biggest reasons? Mental health advocates. These are the individuals who tirelessly share their stories in all sorts of ways. They remind us that we’re not alone in our struggles—and there is real, tangible hope and healing. They shatter stereotypes and myths about mental illness, helping the public see that people with mental illness are just people. As Jennifer Marshall said, “By showing the world that we’re your neighbor, your family members, your friends, and we are not only surviving with these condi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Stigma Suicide Treatment Source Type: blogs
Humanity has come a long way from treating patients who have fallen off cliffs after having tried to fly, dressed like birds: parallel to the development of flying, the practice of how to keep people alive during flights has also greatly evolved. How can digital health add to the practice of aviation medicine in the future and make sure that passengers step off the plane as healthy as they got in? From Icarus through hot air balloons to mid-air meditation The human desire to conquer the sky is a thousand-year-old story, with tales such as the Greek myth about Daedalus and Icarus. The duo wanted to escape from Crete,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers aero aeronautics aviation emergency emergency medicine flight flight medicine Healthcare portable portable diagnostics predictive prevention technology wearables Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 March 2019Source: Physiology &BehaviorAuthor(s): Gaia Fragiotta, Francesco Pierelli, Gianluca Coppola, Carmela Conte, Armando Perrotta, Mariano SerraoAbstractTo explore the role of strong negative emotions in spinal nociception, we evaluated the effect of fear-relevant videos of small animals on the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and reflex-related pain perception in healthy subjects with a specific phobia of small animals. Twenty healthy subjects with a specific phobia of small animals diagnosed according to DSM-V criteria were included in this study. The NWR was evoked in th...
Source: Physiology and Behavior - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion. The SC-NBQ demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity, and may be used for the evaluation of NP in Chinese-speaking patients. Level of Evidence: 2
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH Source Type: research
DiscussionFor Those Who Are Not Christians1. If you are not a Christian, of the reasons for not wanting to become a Christian, are any of those discussed here your reasons? Which reason(s), and why?3B. If you are already a Christian, did any of the reasons for not wanting to believe hold you back? If so, how did you overcome the objection?4.Activities1. In your small group, choose someone to play the narrator, the head guard, the king, the “many paths” preacher, the reincarnation preacher, and the Christian. Act out the vignette, “The Truth Will Out” in this chapter. Discuss its purpose in this chapter.
Source: The Virtual Salt - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: blogs
You might have seen it in your neighborhood health store, your local spa or your corner coffee shop. CBD, aka cannabidiol, is getting mixed into cocktails, lotions and drinks. But what is CBD, exactly? Does it have real health benefits? Is it even safe? To get a better understanding of the compound, TIME spoke to two scientists on the cutting edge of CBD research: Dr. Esther Blessing, an associate professor of psychiatry at New York University, and Margaret Haney, professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and director of the university’s Marijuana Research Laboratory. Blessing and Haney agree th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news
 Suicide is something that most people think they understand, but there are many misconceptions about it. We say it’s a serious problem, yet will mention it casually and insensitively in certain settings. In this episode, our hosts openly discuss suicide and their personal stories with trying to end their own lives.   SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW “I thought about suicide every day for as far back as I can remember.” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From ‘Suicide’ Episode [1:00] Frankly discussing suicide. [3:00] Don’t belittle a person’s suicide attempt. [7:00] Why ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Schizophrenia Suicide Source Type: blogs
Abstract Among chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients, workers' compensation is associated with longer term prescription opioid analgesic use (OAU). The aim was to study the association between receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits and course of OAU. This prospective cohort study utilized data from primary care patients diagnosed with non-cancer CLBP. The outcomes were morphine equivalent dose (MED) - categorized as no OAU, 1-50mg MED, or>50mg MED - and change in MED over time using mixed multinomial logistic regression models. Covariates included sociodemographics, pain severity, pain m...
Source: Pain Physician - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Popul Health Manag Source Type: research
A young boy in Oregon spent 47 days in an intensive care unit (ICU), resulting in more than $800,000 in medical costs, because he was not vaccinated against tetanus, according to a case study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Case study co-author Dr. Carl Eriksson, an assistant professor of pediatric critical care at Oregon Health &Science University, who was involved in the boy’s treatment, wrote in an email to TIME that severe tetanus cases are very rare in the U.S., where vaccination effectively prevents such conditions. The boy’s illness was Oregon’s first pediatr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news
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