The effect of using Fidaxomicin on recurrent Clostridium difficile infection?

Publication date: Available online 4 January 2019Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Martin Biggs, Tariq Iqbal, Elisabeth Holden, Victoria Clewer, Mark I. GarveyAbstractFidaxomicin is a macrocyclic antibiotic licensed for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In the UK, fidaxomicin is often reserved for severe CDI or recurrences. At Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, all courses of fidaxomicin during 2017/18 were reviewed. Thirty-eight patients received fidaxomicin, of which 64% patients responded to treatment when fidaxomicin was given during the first episode of a mild CDI. Conversely, all patients with recurrent CDI (rCDI) failed treatment with fidaxomicin. There were mixed results with using fidaxomicin for severe CDI, with only 42% of patients responding. Our results suggest fidaxomicin is best suited as a treatment for mild CDI during a patient’s first episode.
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Thomas K. Maatman, Jamaica A. Westfall-Snyder, Megan E. Nicolas, Elliott J. Yee, Eugene P. Ceppa, Michael G. House, Attila Nakeeb, C. Max Schmidt, Nicholas J. ZyromskiAbstractIntroductionNecrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.Materials and methodsRetrospective review of 704 NP patients treated at a single-institution (2005–2018)....
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ARIES C. difficile Assay , REF 50-10018, UDI # 00840487100059
Source: Medical Device Recalls - Category: Medical Devices Source Type: alerts
Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Thomas K. Maatman, Jamaica A. Westfall-Snyder, Megan E. Nicolas, Elliott J. Yee, Eugene P. Ceppa, Michael G. House, Attila Nakeeb, C. Max Schmidt, Nicholas J. ZyromskiIntroductionNecrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of 704 NP patients treated at a single-institution (2005-2018).Results10% (67...
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine discovered the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which causes diarrhoea, is gradually 'splitting' into two species.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) accounts for a substantial proportion of deaths attributable to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the United States. Although C. difficile can be an asymptomatic colonizer, its pathogenic potential is most commonly manifested in patients with antibiotic-modified intestinal microbiomes. In a cohort of 186 hospitalized patients, we showed that host and microbe-associated shifts in fecal metabolomes had the potential to distinguish patients with CDI from those with non–C. difficile diarrhea and C. difficile colonization. Patients with CDI exhibited a chemical signature of Sticklan...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Clostridioides difficile is a significant public health threat, and diagnosis of this infection is challenging due to a lack of sensitivity in current diagnostic testing. In this issue of the JCI, Robinson et al. use a logistic regression model based on the fecal metabolome that is able to distinguish between patients with non–C. difficile diarrhea and C. difficile infection, and to some degree, patients who are asymptomatically colonized with C. difficile. The authors construct a metabolic definition of human C. difficile infection, which could improve diagnostic accuracy and aid in the development of targeted thera...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
We report here the first RT 018-related outbreak in France that took place in 4 geriatric units (GU) in Strasbourg, France. From January to December 2017, 38 patients were diagnosed with C. difficile infection (CDI). Strains were first characterized by PCR ribotyping: 19 out of 38 (50%) strains belonged to RT 018. These strains as well as 12 RT 018 isolated in other French healthcare facilities and 2 strains of RT 018 isolated in the GU in 2015 were characterized by multi locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), whole genome multi locus sequence typing (wgMLST) and core genome single nucleotide polymorph...
Source: Anaerobe - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Anaerobe Source Type: research
Necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) patients commonly require antibiotic treatment during the several month-long disease course. We hypothesized that Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common in NP and significantly impacts outcomes.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionXpert SA Nasal Complete for MRSA detection, Xpert C. difficile, and Xpert Norovirus can be used as POCT solely by HCWs in a ward setting. Each assay was used throughout a seven-day/24 h period with potential positive impact on bed management and patient care.
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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