What Does Verily Have up Its Sleeve with New Financing Round?

If there’s one thing you can count on, it’s that Verily, Alphabet Inc.’s life sciences division, won’t stay quiet for long. Only a few days into 2019 and Verily, formerly Google’s life sciences arm, is already announcing a $1 billion investment round. The South San Francisco, CA-based company said the hefty round was led by Silver Lake, and proceeds would be used to support growth in key strategic areas, including investments in strategic partnerships, global business development opportunities, and potential acquisitions. Other new investors in the round include Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan and other global investment management firms. “We are taking external funding to increase flexibility and optionality as we expand on our core strategic focus areas,” Andrew Conrad, CEO of Verily, said in a release. “Adding a well-rounded group of seasoned investors, led by Silver Lake, will further prepare us to execute as healthcare continues the shift towards evidence generation and value-based reimbursement models.” Verily has been anything but quiet in the healthcare sector. The company has a list of collaborators that read like a who’s who of the medtech and pharma for that matter. In early 2018, MD+DI published a list of seven key partnerships that helped Verily establish itself in the ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health Business Source Type: news

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AbstractBackgroundObstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with a variety of systemic diseases. Among patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD), the prevalence of OSAS is high. OSAS can induce progression of CKD. However, whether or not OSAS can cause renal damage in healthy people is not clear. Thus, the purpose of this meta-analysis was to elucidate whether or not there was an association between OSAS and early renal damage.MethodsPubMed, Embase Database, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journals Database, and Wan...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with a variety of systemic diseases. Among patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD), the prevalence of OSAS is high. OSAS can induce progression of CKD. However, whether or not OSAS can cause renal damage in healthy people is not clear. Thus, the purpose of this meta-analysis was to elucidate whether or not there was an association between OSAS and early renal damage. METHODS: PubMed, Embase Database, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medicine Database, Chinese Scientific Journa...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
This study aims to determine if SCZ patients are at increased risk of incident OSA.MethodsA total of 5092 newly diagnosed SCZ patients and 5092 non-SCZ controls matched by gender, age, and index year were included between 2000 and 2012 and followed to 2013. Participants newly diagnosed with OSA were defined as incidents. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the OSA incidence rate between the two groups studied.ResultsSCZ patients were at increased risk of OSA compared to non-SCZ controls after adjusting for gender, age, comorbidities, and duration of anti...
Source: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis population base study demonstrated that patients with long-duration of PPI use are at a higher risk of developing asthma, regardless of age, gender, comorbidities, and medications.
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Meta ‐analyses of clinical trials typically focus on one outcome at a time. However, treatment decision‐making depends on an overall assessment of outcomes balancing benefit in various domains and potential risks. This calls for meta‐analysis methods for combined outcomes that encompass information from different domains. When individual patient data (IPD) are available from all studies, combined outcomes can be calculated for each individual and standard meta‐analysis methods would apply. However, IPD are usually difficult to obtain. We propose a method to estimate the overall treatment ef fect for combined outcom...
Source: Research Synthesis Methods - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
MONDAY, May 4, 2020 -- Black Americans with severe sleep apnea and other sleep problems are at increased risk for high blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, a new study finds. The researchers examined sleep patterns and blood sugar...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
In conclusion, SG is an effective procedure for weight loss with a low risk for the patient to develop malnutrition. In terms of post-operative care, regular check-ups are vital to ensure a positive outcome as well as for the early detection of possible issues. Reflux and weight regain are common issues with SG in a long-term follow-up; thus, patients should be selected carefully for this procedure. PMID: 32359172 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Surgical Technology International - Category: Surgery Tags: Surg Technol Int Source Type: research
Conclusion: The relationship between snoring and obesity has not been well explored. This study among slum-dwelling Indian women found a significant relationship between snoring and obesity. Future research should explore the underlying mechanisms connecting snoring to BMI.
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Suggests that targeting sleep may help prevent diabetes and improve treatment.
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - Category: American Health Source Type: news
(NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) African-Americans with severe sleep apnea and other adverse sleep patterns are much more likely to have high blood glucose levels -- a risk factor for diabetes -- than those without these patterns, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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