Analysis of the drop-out rate in patients receiving mepolizumab for severe asthma in real life

We describe herein the drop-out rate observed with mepolizumab in real life, because this datum can indirectly reflect the safety and tolerability aspects. The demographic and clinical data of patients receiving mepolizumab for severe asthma were collected, and the number and reasons for discontinuation of the treatment were analyzed. The database involves 143 patients (67 male, age range 19–80 year) who received at least one dose of mepolizumab. The observed discontinuation rate was 6/143 (4.2%). Five out of 6 discontinuations were due to lack of response, and one was an adverse event (urticaria) probably related to the treatment. There was no clinical difference between the drop-out group and the patients still ongoing. As compared to the clinical trials published the discontinuation rate was lower in our population, especially for adverse events (7% vs 23.7%). Thus, the tolerability of mepolizumab, as derived from discontinuations, seems to be better in real-life than in clinical trials.
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

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Conclusion: Anti-TPO IgE is a useful biomarker for differentiating between clinical phenotypes of patients with CSU. Elevation of anti-TPO IgE during exacerbation periods supports an association between this autoantibody and the pathogenesis of urticaria. PMID: 31886301 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
We report a case of serum sickness-like reaction in a patient treated with omalizumab for chronic idiopathic urticaria/angioedema. An adult female experienced episodic urticaria/angioedema without repeatable trigger, ultimately receiving diagnosis of chronic idiopathic urticaria/angioedema. After initial treatment, attempts with escalating cetirizine and montelukast doses were unsuccessful due to sedation; she began treatment with subcutaneous omalizumab 150 mg monthly. Urticaria frequency partially improved after two injections; therefore, the dose was increased to 300 mg after four treatments. Several days afte...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology &TherapeuticsAuthor(s): Eleonora Di Salvo, Vincenzo Patella, Marco Casciaro, Sebastiano GangemiAbstractMontelukast the leukotriene receptor antagonist is an anti-inflammatory drug that causes bronchodilation and for this reason it is used to improve inflammatory states in asthma and allergic rhinitis. Montelukast is generally considered a safe drug with the occurrence of a few adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and anti-leucotrienes are usually well-tolerated by adults and young patients. Starting from these premises the purpose of this review...
Source: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Recent studies have highlighted the multidimensional effect of atopic dermatitis (AD) and urticaria. Patient burden for these conditions is largely driven by the intense itching, sleep disturbance, comorbidities, and mental health illness associated with these diseases.1-3 Immunologic, microbial, and epithelial interactions have been reported to play an important role in AD.4,5 Novel therapies and management approaches are targeting the mechanisms underlying AD and urticaria.6,7 The current issue of the Annals contains 3 outstanding reviews that update readers on the pathophysiology and evolving treatments for AD and chronic urticaria.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
We report here a case of an elderly patient with refractory BP whose symptoms of pruritus and blistering became well-controlled with the addition of dupilumab to the treatment regimen.
Source: Dermatology Online Journal - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
AbstractAntihistamines are currently one of the most commonly administered categories of drugs. They are used to treat symptoms that are secondary to histamine release, which is typical of certain allergic conditions, including rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Cetirizine belongs to the second-generation family, so, it is very selective for peripheral H1 receptors, is potent and quickly relieves symptoms, exerts additional anti-allergic/anti-inflammatory effects, and is usually well-tolerated. It has been marketed 30  years ago. In these years, a remarkable body of evidence has been built...
Source: Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is recurrent episodes of urticaria with or without angioedema for 6 weeks or longer due to unknown (nonphysical) causes.1 Although CSU tends to be self-limited in most patients, it has still been shown to markedly affect quality of life.1 The most recent data suggest a 0.5-1% prevalence of CSU in the general population.2 The trigger for CSU is often not known; but there is an association with autoimmune disease.3-5 The treatment includes up to four times (4x) standard dosing of second-generation long-acting H1 antihistamines, short-acting H1 antihistamines, H2 antihistamines, and/or leuk...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) involves recurrent episodes of urticaria with or without angioedema for 6 weeks or longer from unknown (nonphysical) causes.1 Although CSU tends to be self-limited in most patients, it still markedly affects quality of life.1 The most recent data suggest a 0.5% to 1% prevalence of CSU in the general population.2 The trigger for CSU is often not known, but there is an association with autoimmune disease.3-5 The treatment includes up to 4 times the standard dosing of second-generation long-acting histamine1 (H1) –antihistamines, short-acting H1-antihistamines, histamine2 (H2)–a...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
PMID: 31805358 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
PMID: 31761014 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
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