Sesame: An unrecognized trigger of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome

Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 7, Issue 1Author(s): Adi Ovadia, Amit Nahum, Diana Tasher, Shirli Abiri, Larisa Epov, Aharon Kessel, Ilan Dalal
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of a mixture of probiotics on food allergy in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model. Treatment with the probiotics attenuated OVA-induced allergic symptoms in mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed that oral administration of probiotics induced mucosal CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs), which promoted differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the probiotics modulated the composition of microbiota, especially by increasing the proportion of the Deferribacteres and Verrucomicrobia phyla and the Mucispirillum and Clostridium XlVa genera, which in t...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 February 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Amanda Schneider, Manish Ramesh
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Neutrophils are appreciated to perform a wide range of pro- and anti-inflammatory effector functions in diverse settings. These go far beyond the response to acute infection, encompassing sterile injury, autoimmunity, allergy and tumours. There is growing appreciation of the nuances of their modes of action, especially elucidation of the nature and consequences of NETosis. New work suggests that it is time to give greater consideration to the anti-inflammatory role of neutrophils, such as in the control of cytokine release during sepsis. PMID: 30767207 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 February 2019Source: Nitric OxideAuthor(s): M. Bobrowska-Korzeniowska, I. Stelmach, A. Brzozowska, J. Jerzyńska, M. Mitał, W. StelmachAbstractTo date, some studies suggest that passive smoking (PS) may be an important determinant of FeNO levels in children but sill there is a need of investigations using objective methods of PS exposure.The aim of our study was to examine the effect of PS, measured by urine cotinine levels, on FeNO and lung function (FEV1) in allergic and non-allergic asthmatic children.MethodsIt was a prospective, non-interventional study. 140 children, aged 4&ndash...
Source: Nitric Oxide - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
ConclusionAlthough the majority of ARs during OIT are non anaphylactic, AARs occur frequently. Children with higher sIgE for alpha-lactalbumine and casein at baseline seem to be at higher risk for AARs during OIT.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionInitiating CI in patients with proven immediate hypersensitivity to CA or OX appeared to be safe in our study.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): William C. Anderson, Rahul Gondalia, Heather E. Hoch, Leanne Kaye, Stanley J. Szefler, David A. Stempel
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Markus G. Seidel, Gerhard Kindle, Benjamin Gathmann, Isabella Quinti, Matthew Buckland, Joris van Montfrans, Raphael Scheible, Stephan Rusch, Lukas M. Gasteiger, Bodo Grimbacher, Nizar Mahlaoui, Stephan Ehl, Michael Albert, Sarah Beaussant Cohen, Jacinta Bustamante, Andrew Cant, Jean-Laurent Casanova, Helen Chapel, Genevieve de Saint Basile, Esther de VriesAbstractPatient registries are instrumental for clinical research in rare diseases. They help to achieve a sufficient sample size for epidemio...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Mervin Piñones, Cecilia Vizcaya, Guillermo Pérez-Mateluna, Rodrigo Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Arturo Borzutzky
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere is an unexplained slight increase in SCIT-related fatalities for 2015-2017, although mean annual reported events over 9 years (0.8 fatal reactions/year) have declined. SCIT-related infections were not identified during two years of surveillance. The 15% incidence of delayed-onset SRs (> 30 min) is similar to a prior annual survey. Prescribing epinephrine auto-injectors for SCIT does not appear to improve outcomes, possibly due to low rates of self-administration.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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