Whopping Numbers on Whooping Cough

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 -- The return of measles made headlines in recent years, but it's not the only disease that poses a particular threat to kids that has experienced a resurgence. Another is pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough because...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Beloved Hollywood celebrities, famous politicians or members of the British royal family: no better advertisement for fitness tracker producers and health tech companies. As models, actors and actresses are highly influential people, their early adoption of digital solutions could also push the masses towards living more healthily with technologies. On the other hand, celebrities are inclined to follow questionable health trends, too, which go against decades of medical evidence. Those examples, everyone should rather reject. Wearables conquered Hollywood, the White House, and the British royal family Celebrities are all a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Social media in Healthcare celebrities digital health digital technologies digital technology famous fitness future health influencer health influencers Hollywood trackers trends wearables wellness Source Type: blogs
[The Conversation Africa] Over the years vaccines have prevented countless cases of disease and saved millions of lives. Infectious diseases like polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), rubella (German measles), smallpox, mumps, tetanus and rotavirus used to be common around the world. Today vaccines can prevent them.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
22 April 2018, Cairo – This year’s World Immunization Week campaign, celebrated from 24 to 30 April, aims to highlight that protecting entire communities with vaccines protects everyone and so the theme of this year’s campaign is “Protected Together, #VaccinesWork”.  Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Studies show that every US$ 1 spent on childhood immunization returns US$ 44 in economic and social benefits.  Immunization protects everyone – from infants to senior citizens – against disabling illnesses, disability a...
Source: WHO EMRO News - Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news
[MSF] Being vaccinated against diseases like diphtheria, measles, whooping cough, meningitis, pneumonia, yellow fever, and other potentially fatal illnesses is a commonplace event for many children. But in northern Mali, where a combination of insecurity, isolation, and limited health infrastructure means that many communities cannot access health facilities, it can prove difficult to protect children against these illnesses.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
When preparations are underway for vaccinations to take place, my household becomes a war zone. The thought of an impending vaccine, to my boys, resembles the actual possibility of a weapons attack. It is, in essence, a weapon. It’s a needle that comes your way and invades the comfort of your normally undisturbed skin surface. But it also serves a purpose — much like the police department does — to protect and serve. It arms your body against any future attack. It revs up your immune system and prepares its antibody soldiers, so they’re ready when the threat becomes real. It has helped us to practic...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Physician Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The message is clear, as far as governments are concerned: the more often something is repeated, the more likely the public will believe it. Or, in the words of Joseph Goebbels, “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” [8]   References https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com…history-and-biology-of-vaccines/ http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/magic-madness-governments-nlp-assault-our-minds https://thenib.com/vaccines-work-here-are-the-facts-5de3d0f9ffd0 https://www.popsci.com/16-african-countries-have-overtaken-us-measles-vaccinations https:...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Christina England Logical Top Stories Maki Naro NLP truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Certain adults should be vaccinated against measles, mumps and whooping cough, diseases that are making a comeback.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Whooping Cough Vaccination and Immunization Mumps Shingles (Disease) Tetanus Measles Source Type: news
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