Synodos does it again: Breaking barriers to solve the 'impossible' problems

(Children's Tumor Foundation) Treatment for low-grade gliomas in patients living with neurofibromatosis type 1 are now one step closer thanks to recent research discoveries initiated and funded by the Children's Tumor Foundation. The Foundation's SYNODOS consortium has just recently been published in Nature Medicine, showing that immunotherapy has the potential to impact gliomas.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Related Links:

In conclusion, bevacizumab is well tolerated and appears most effective for rapid tumor control to preserve vision and improve morbidity.
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
ute;lmán B Abstract The product of the neurofibromin gene (NF1) belongs to the family of tumor suppressor proteins. Neurofibromin plays important roles in the negative regulation of signaling pathways where the Ras oncogen is involved. The protein and gene names were derived from the disease, neurofibromatosis type 1 that is caused by germline mutations in NF1 and inherited by an autosomal dominant manner. Besides germline mutations, acquired, somatic mutations are also observed in NF1 in several malignant and benign tumors. NF1 mutations have been identified in a great number of solid tumors, leukemias and...
Source: Magyar Onkologia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Magy Onkol Source Type: research
Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder affecting 1 per 3000 individuals on average. Patients develop a variety of developmental benign and malignant pathologies. The most common tumors associated with NF1 are peripheral sheath tumors, including neurofibromas, optical gliomas, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel analogs of the natural product schweinfurthin that inhibits growth of NF1-associated pathologies. The schweinfurthin analogs show inhibitory activity against mouse and human NF1 cancer cell lines. Glioma, diffuse B cell lymphom...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are predisposed to develop central nervous system neoplasms, the most common of which are low‐grade gliomas (LGGs). The absence of human NF1 associated LGG‐derived cell lines, coupled with an inability to generate patient‐derived xenograft models, represents barriers to profile molecularly targeted therapies for these tumors. Thus, genetically engineered mouse models have been identified to evaluate the interplay between Nf1‐deficient tumor cells and nonneoplastic stromal cells to evaluate potential therapies for these neoplasms. Future treatments might also con...
Source: Pediatric Blood and Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
We report on the case of a 5-year-old boy with NF1 developing two tumors. PMID: 28870819 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
Abstract Although the neurofibromatoses consist of at least three autosomal dominantly inherited disorders, neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis, NF1 represents a multisystem pleiotropic condition very different from the other two. NF1 is a genetic syndrome first manifesting in childhood; affecting multiple organs, childhood development, and neurocognitive status; and presenting the clinician with often complex management decisions that require a multidisciplinary approach. Molecular genetic testing (see article for detailed discussion) is recommended to confirm NF1, particular...
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
Authors: Solga AC, Toonen JA, Pan Y, Cimino PJ, Ma Y, Castillon GA, Gianino SM, Ellisman MH, Lee DY, Gutmann DH Abstract Low-grade gliomas are one of the most common brain tumors in children, where they frequently form within the optic pathway (optic pathway gliomas; OPGs). Since many OPGs occur in the context of the Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome, we have previously employed Nf1 genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) strains to study the pathogenesis of these low-grade glial neoplasms. In the light of the finding that human and mouse low-grade gliomas are composed of Olig2+ cells and tha...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Pan Y, Bush EC, Toonen JA, Ma Y, Solga AC, Sims PA, Gutmann DH Abstract The concept that solid tumors are maintained by a productive interplay between neoplastic and non-neoplastic elements has gained traction with the demonstration that stromal fibroblasts and immune system cells dictate cancer development and progression. While less studied, brain tumor (glioma) biology is likewise influenced by non-neoplastic immune system cells (macrophages and microglia) which interact with neoplastic glioma cells to create a unique physiological state (glioma ecosystem) distinct from that found in the normal tissue. ...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Abstract Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) cancer predisposition syndrome are prone to the development of low-grade brain tumors (gliomas) within the optic pathway (optic gliomas). One of the key obstacles to developing successful therapeutic strategies for these tumors is the striking lack of information about the mechanical properties that characterize these tumors relative to non-neoplastic optic nerve tissue. To study the physical changes that may occur when an optic nerve glioma is present, we employed atomic force microscopy to measure the stiffness of healthy versus tumor-bearing optic nerve tiss...
Source: Biophysical Journal - Category: Physics Authors: Tags: Biophys J Source Type: research
Authors: Pan Y, Smithson LJ, Ma Y, Hambardzumyan D, Gutmann DH Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults, with a median survival of 15 months. These poor clinical outcomes have prompted the development of drugs that block neoplastic cancer cell growth; however, non-neoplastic cell-derived signals (chemokines and cytokines) in the tumor microenvironment may also represent viable treatment targets. One such chemokine, Ccl5, produced by low-grade tumor-associated microglia, is responsible for maintaining neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mouse optic glioma growth in vivo. Since malign...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Brain Tumor | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Children | Glioma | Immunotherapy | Neurofibromatosis | Neurology