Tumor-analysis technology enables speedier treatment decisions for bowel cancer patients

Technology helps hospitals make earlier and more accurate treatment decisions and survival assessments for patients with bowel cancer. A novel medical imaging technology, TexRAD, which analyses the texture of tumors, has been shown in trials to enable early diagnosis of those bowel cancer patients not responding to the standard cancer therapy better than other available tumor markers.
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Eating 35lb of allium vegetables a year could reduce your bowel cancer risk, a study claims. It found that people that ate the most had a 79 per cent reduced risk of the cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CANCER symptoms can sometimes be confused with minor health problems, putting people off seeing a doctor and getting an early diagnosis. If this happens to you when you go to the toilet, see a doctor as it could be a sign of bowel cancer.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CANCER symptoms can sometimes be confused with minor health problems, putting people off seeing a doctor and getting an early diagnosis. If this happens to you when you go to the toilet, see a doctor as it could be a sign of bowel cancer.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
People with bowel cancer often have higher levels of certain toxic-producing bacteria. The toxin has now been shown to damage DNA in gut cells in mice
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
Authors: Ju F, Li N, Wang W, Yuan H Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC), also known as bowel cancer, is one of the leading causes of cancer‑associated mortality worldwide at present. The aim of the present study was to detect the effects of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) on the viability and migration of a CRC cell line in the presence or absence of variation X‑ray radiation doses. The CRC cell line, SW620, was cultured and treated with different X‑ray doses (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 3 and 6 Gy). MMP1 expression was downregulated via the application of a specific small interfering (si)‑RNA. The viability a...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
CANCER symptoms are wide ranging and not always obvious, so it ’s important to be aware of the main signs to look for. If this happens when you go to the toilet, see a doctor as it could be a sign of bowel cancer.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Simpler test thought to have contributed to figures Related items fromOnMedica New test prompts rise in bowel screening uptake Invest in workforce to roll out bowel cancer screening, urges former health secretary Cancer strategies failed to improve one-year survival Faecal blood testing best to spot cancer and cost-effective Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Study looked at sedentary behaviours of 90,000 women. Researcher Dr Yin Cao from Washington University School of Medicine said younger people may benefit from screening.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC) is common with 3% of cases associated with germline mutations in the mismatch repair pathway characteristic of Lynch syndrome (LS). The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends screening for LS in all patients newly diagnosed with CRC, irrespective of age. The Yorkshire Cancer Research Bowel Cancer Improvement Programme includes a regional LS screening service for all new diagnoses of CRC. In the first 829 cases screened, 80 cases showed deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) including four cases showing areas with loss of expression of all four mismatch repair pro...
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Pathol Source Type: research
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have discovered a protective mechanism which is used by the body to protect intestinal stem cells from turning cancerous. The body's innate immune system was found to play a pivotal role in this regard. The researchers were able to demonstrate that, rather than having a purely defensive role, the immune system is crucial in maintaining a healthy body. The study has been published in the renowned scientific journal Nature*.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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