Effects of weight-lifting or resistance exercise on breast cancer-related lymphedema: A systematic review

Publication date: Available online 24 December 2018Source: International Journal of Nursing SciencesAuthor(s): Ausanee Wanchai, Jane M. ArmerAbstractThe purpose of this systematic review was to identify the effects of weight-lifting or resistance exercise on breast cancer-related lymphedema. Published articles written in English were retrieved from electronic databases, including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. Hand-searches for unpublished papers were also completed. Content analysis was used to examine articles that met the inclusion criteria. Among 525 searched papers, 15 papers met the inclusion criteria: 13 trials evaluated weight-lifting or resistance exercise alone and two trials evaluated weight-lifting or resistance exercise plus aerobic exercise. The results of the review showed that no arm volume change was observed for either exercise modality. In addition, six included studies showed that weight-lifting or resistance exercise did not cause lymphedema or adverse events in patients at risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema. For patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema, six studies reported that change of swelling outcome measures were not significantly different between the weight-lifting or resistance exercise group and the control group. However, three included studies reported that volume of arm was significantly more reduced in the weight-lifting or resistance exercise group than those in the control group. The findings suggest that...
Source: International Journal of Nursing Sciences - Category: Nursing Source Type: research

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AbstractThere is limited evidence regarding the combined effect of exercise and compression garment on breast cancer –related lymphedema (BCRL). Therefore, we investigate the effect of low-intensity resistance training alone or in combination with a compression garment on lymphedema volume, self-reported lymphedema symptoms, and shoulder mobility and function. A total of 60 women with unilateral BCRL were random ly assigned to low-intensity resistance exercises (Rex group,n = 30) or exercises and compression garment (Rex-Com-group,n = 30). Both groups take part in exercises program consist...
Source: Journal of Cancer Education - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsTo our knowledge, this is the largest study to date detailing the comorbidities associated with LE and LE treatment rates within each. Our findings suggest that a sizable proportion of cancer-related LE patients do not receive appropriate treatment. Furthermore, this study highlights the role of advanced venous disease as an LE comorbidity that is frequently untreated and its associated gap in treatment.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Condition:   Lymphedema Interventions:   Device: intermittent pneumatic compression;   Procedure: complex decongestive therapy Sponsor:   Adnan Menderes University Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Breast Carcinoma;   Mammoplasty Patient Interventions:   Procedure: Mammoplasty;   Procedure: Vascularized Lymph Node Transfer Sponsors:   M.D. Anderson Cancer Center;   National Cancer Institute (NCI) Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsIn this study, a complaint of arm swelling was not sensitive enough for detection of the early onset of LE because a certain number of patients constantly complained of this symptom. Measurements of circumference might help in the diagnosis of LE onset, but this method is not specific enough because these measurements are also affected by various factors. However, BIA and skin and subcutaneous ultrasound were identified as potential tools for the early detection of LE.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Lymphatic Research and Biology,Volume 17, Issue 3, Page 287-287, June 2019.
Source: Lymphatic Research and Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 June 2019Source: European Journal of Surgical OncologyAuthor(s): Muriel Abbaci, Angelica Conversano, Frederic De Leeuw, Corinne Laplace-Builhé, Mazouni ChafikaAbstractSentinel lymph node identification by near infrared (NIR) fluorescence with indocyanine green (ICG) is recognized in the literature as a useful technique. NIR fluorescence technology could become key in the prevention and management of lymphedema after axillary dissection for breast cancer. Here, we conducted a systematic review focusing on ICG imaging to improve lymphedema prevention and treatment after axillary su...
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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