Chrysin protects human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by inhibiting inflammatory mediator expression via HMGB1 suppression.

Chrysin protects human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by inhibiting inflammatory mediator expression via HMGB1 suppression. Mol Med Rep. 2018 Dec 04;: Authors: Zhang C, Yu W, Huang C, Ding Q, Liang C, Wang L, Hou Z, Zhang Z Abstract High‑mobility group box chromosomal protein (HMGB‑1) contributes to osteoarthritis (OA) by modulating various oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathways. The effect of chrysin (CH), a natural plant flavonoid, and its functional interaction with HMGB‑1, was investigated in a chondrocyte model of OA. Human chondrocytes were pre‑treated with CH, and then subsequently treated with IL‑1β to induce the formation of chondrocytes similar to those found in OA joints. Next, the expression level of HMGB‑1 was determined by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Additionally, inflammatory factor expression was measured by ELISA, and cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. To further explore the effects of CH, HMGB‑1 expression was silenced following CH treatment with small interfering (si)RNA. The results demonstrated that CH inhibited cell apoptosis, dose‑dependently reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13, collagenase and IL‑6 expression, and increased collagen α‑1 (II) chain (COL2A1) expression in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. These effects of CH were accompanied by decreased HMGB‑1 expression. Additionally, the expression of MMP13, collagenase, IL...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research

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Conclusions: The finding of high fall risks in more than one-third of all participants with KOA is consistent with previous reports of a higher risk of falling in this population. Many PT participants did receive some balance training; however, one-third of participants at high risk for falling did not. Balance training for individuals with KOA at high risk for falling may be underutilized.
Source: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Tags: Research Reports Source Type: research
Osteoarthritis (OA) is designated the 11th highest contributor of 291 diseases of global disability and the most common cause of chronic disability in elderly people. OA has a devastating impact on quality of life and represents an enormous socio-economic burden. Currently, OA is incurable, and no approved medications, biological therapy, or procedure prevents the progressive destruction of the osteoarthritic knee joint. All current treatments provide symptomatic relief rather than preventative or regenerative results. There is an urgent and compelling need to find, validate, and test new biological therapeutics. Cell-base...
Source: Gerontology - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine with various functions ranging from regulating inflammatory pathways to immune system responses. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with excess inflammation which has been implicated as a mechanism in the transition from acute to chronic pain. However, through the classic signaling pathway, IL-6 can also act as an anti-inflammatory myokine, an indication of muscle growth and myogenesis. However, its association with body composition and how they are associated with pain following surgery are not well defined.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of disability in older adults. Total healthcare costs tend to rise as pain severity associated with OA increases. To understand treatment and healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) by OA pain severity, data were collected from Feb-May 2017 using US Adelphi Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional survey of primary care physicians, rheumatologists, orthopedists and their patients. Descriptive statistics were used and all data were analysed using SPSS v6 and Stata v14.1.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Treating chronic low back pain (CLBP) with spine-focused interventions is common, potentially dangerous, and often ineffective. We posit that CLBP in older adults is a geriatric syndrome – a final common pathway for the expression of multiple contributors. We have published evidence and expert consensus-based algorithms to guide evaluation and treatment of key biopsychosocial CLBP contributors in older adults – hip osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, fibromyalgia, sacroiliac joint syndrome, lumbar spinal stenosis, leg length inequality, lateral hip/thigh pain, anxiety, depression, insomnia, and maladaptive coping....
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Before the height of the opioid crisis, research had well-established older Blacks ’ reluctance to use opioids due to concerns about side effects, addiction, and overdose. Our study found that 30% of Blacks used opioid medications within the past 30 days to manage joint pain. Given this proportion of users, we investigated demographic, social, clinical, and behavioral patterns d istinguishing opioid consumers and non-consumers. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, one-way ANOVA, and qualitative content analysis summarize data for community-dwelling Black adults (≥50 years age) with symptomatic osteoarthritis.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthritic condition and a leading cause of pain and disability in people 45 years and older. As the biopsychosocial model of pain hypothesizes that pain is dynamically affected by multidimensional factors, there is a growing interest to understand the biological factors that influence pain among older adults. Beta-endorphin is suggested to be involved in pain sensitivity, but few studies have examined the relationship between beta-endorphin and experimental pain sensitivity in older adults.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Since the brain is the organ that is principally responsible for processing the experiences of pain, the emergence of neuroimaging for quantifying pain-related responses is promising. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is particularly favorable for studying pain since this optical method is noninvasive, portable, and cost-effective. However, no studies have directly evaluated the cortical hemodynamic response to pain in older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using fNIRS. In this pilot study, we sought to investigate the cortical response of older adults with knee OA to contact thermal stimuli.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
CNTX-0290 is an oral, nonopioid hSSTR4 agonist under investigation for analgesia. Activity was assessed in acute, nociceptive, and neuropathic rat pain models. In the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) model, maximum efficacy of CNTX-0290 0.03 –3 mg/kg vs vehicle was compared with indomethacin 30 mg/kg and celecoxib 10 mg/kg; minimal effective dose (MED) was determined. In the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) osteoarthritis model, weight-bearing deficit (WBD) was assessed following CNTX-0290 0.01–30 mg/kg administration.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful condition and intra-articular corticosteroids (IACS) are often used to manage OA pain. In Phase 2/3 clinical studies, triamcinolone acetonide extended-release (TA-ER) demonstrated sustained, clinically meaningful pain relief compared with saline-placebo using general Average Daily Pain (ADP)-intensity scores, and compared with saline-placebo and TA crystalline solution (TAcs) using disease-specific Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC-A) measures.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
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